2019-20 Student Handbook 
    
    Feb 22, 2020  
2019-20 Student Handbook

General College Policies


An individual may contact the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education for review of a complaint. The bureau may be contacted at 2355 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833 or online at www.bppe.ca.gov or by telephone: 916-431-6924 or by fax 916-263-1897.


Alcohol and Drug Policy and California Law

Pitzer College Alcohol and Drug Policy

In light of Pitzer’s distinct educational objective that students develop “concern with the social consequences and ethical implications of knowledge and action,” the College has put in place an alcohol and drug policy grounded in the individual and collective responsibility of each member of the Pitzer community. It is the College’s intent that, “through examining the social consequences and ethical implications of the issues they explore, students learn to evaluate the effects of individual actions and social policies and take responsibility for making the world we live in a better place.” This policy seeks to apply this philosophy to the social life of our own community.

As an institution of higher education, Pitzer College seeks to promote responsible decision-making on the part of all members of the College community, especially in choices which affect their own health and safety and that of others. The irresponsible use and abuse of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco can result in serious health damage, such as liver disease, respiratory problems and brain damage. Misuse can lead to socially and morally unacceptable behavior such as driving under the influence, sexual violence and violation, impaired judgment with regard to safer sex practices, vandalism and property damage. Such behavior, in addition to being destructive to individuals, is destructive of the community environment that is a key element of Pitzer College.

Students are encouraged to take advantage of alcohol and drug education opportunities made available through college resources such as regular alcohol awareness workshops offered to Pitzer students through Health Education Outreach. Additional resources are available for individual needs. Among those who have been trained and are prepared to provide information support and referral are Resident Assistants, Residence Directors, Deans, and. Students may also wish to consult faculty advisers or the Office of the Chaplains. Monsour Counseling Center can arrange for professional assessment of substance use and abuse and can provide referral for professional treatment. Students are urged to utilize the full range of services and resources that are thus made available to them.

In adopting and implementing its alcohol and drug policy, Pitzer College is complying with Public Law 101-226, the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, which requires the College to have a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol on its property or as part of any of its activities.

In November 2016, California voters approved the passage of Proposition 64, making the recreational use of marijuana by those 21 and older legal.  However, as a recipient of federal funds, Pitzer remains in compliance with the federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, as well as the Drug-Free Workplace Act which prohibits marijuana possession, cultivation, sale, transfer, and/or use at colleges and universities. Pitzer receives federal funding and must comply with this federal law in order to receive federal funding.

As such, marijuana use and possession on Pitzer’s campus is prohibited. Documentation of medically prescribed marijuana will not exempt a student or their guest from complying with the College’s Drug Policy. Marijuana, other drugs and drug paraphernalia, including bongs, pipes and all smoking devices are in violation of Pitzer’s Code of Student Conduct, and will be confiscated and discarded if observed by members of the College staff. Pitzer College encourages students to engage in responsible use practices.

In addition, there are liability issues for both students and the College. Pitzer College community members, regardless of status, are subject to local, state and federal laws, as well as applicable campus policies, and in light of our educational objectives, are to exercise personal and collective responsibility in regard to these laws and campus policies. Faculty adherence is a matter for the Dean of Faculty. Staff adherence is a matter for the Director of Human Resources. Student adherence is the responsibility of the Dean of Students. The following College regulations on alcohol and drug use apply to students.

The College will, whenever possible, seek to use educational and rehabilitative methods to deal with problems related to drug and alcohol consumption. However, where offenses warrant, the College will not hesitate to use all sanctions available, including expulsion from the College. The range of sanctions is listed under the Code of Student Conduct.

  1. Regulations Regarding Alcoholic Beverages

The illegal consumption of alcohol and drugs is not permitted at Pitzer College, or at College-sponsored off-campus activities, and is subject to administrative or judicial response. Furthermore, the College strongly discourages the irresponsible consumption of alcohol at the College and at College-sponsored off-campus activities. The consumption of alcohol by students over 21 years of age is allowed at approved registered events and in the privacy of their own room, provided their behavior does not disturb others. The following are the Colleges alcohol policies:

  1. Alcohol possession in residence halls is permitted only by students of legal age (21). Alcohol may be consumed only by legal-age students in students’ rooms, or with the exception of special events, registered with the Dean of Students or their designee. Consumption of alcohol should not infringe on the rights of other students.

  2. Students of legal age may not give or sell alcohol to students under the legal age to transport, possess or consume. Students under the legal age may not transport, possess, consume or purchase alcohol in any area of the residence halls.

  3. Students under the legal age may not possess any empty alcoholic beverage containers in their residence hall rooms. The only exception is when a roommate is of legal age and owns the container.

  4. Alcohol containers should not be displayed in areas visible to the public and are subject to disposal if observed.

  5. Students may not possess or transport open containers of alcoholic beverages in public areas.

  6. Students may not consume alcoholic beverages in public areas including, but not limited to: administrative and academic buildings, residence hall common areas including lobbies, living rooms, special purpose    rooms, corridors, basements, stairwells, laundry and vending machine areas; and outdoor areas including sun decks, courtyards, parking lots, etc.

  7. Large quantities of alcohol are prohibited at unregistered events, in private rooms and in residence halls (e.g. kegs, pony kegs, beer balls, etc.). Such quantities of alcohol and dispensing devices will be confiscated and will not be returned.

  8. The Substance Free Early Arrival Period and Dry Week policy is in effect at the beginning of the fall semester, once early arrivals come to campus, throughout Orientation and the first week of classes. Dry Week ends on the Sunday after the first week of classes.  Being “dry” means alcohol and other substances may not be consumed or served on campus.
  9. Games that are centered on alcohol, focus on drinking large quantities of alcohol or promote irresponsible drinking are prohibited. Any devices or paraphernalia which aid in these games will be confiscated and will not be returned. These devices include, but are not limited to beer pong or “Beirut” tables and cups and beer bongs or funnels.

  10. Disorderly behavior related to alcohol use. Hosts, sponsoring individuals and/or organizations are responsible and accountable for such behavior.

  11. Any advertising for events, which indicates or implies that alcohol is to be served or sold. The College requires the prior approval of all advertising for events by the Dean of Students or her/his designee.

  12. The use of student activity funds to purchase alcoholic beverages.

  13. Tampering or altering student ID’s or using false ID.

  1. Regulations Regarding Drugs

The following are prohibited:

  1. The possession, use, cultivation, sale, or transfer of illicit drugs. Such drugs will be confiscated and may be destroyed.

  2. The selling or transfer of prescription drugs.

  3. The possession of drug paraphernalia, including pipes, needles or other contrivances used in the consumption of illicit drugs. Such paraphernalia will be confiscated and may be destroyed.

  4. Disorderly behavior related to drug use. Individuals will be held accountable for such behavior.

 

  1. Registration of Special Events

See Event Registration and Hosting Guidelines - Alcohol for the alcohol policy for registered events through the Office of Student Affairs.

State and Local Alcohol and Drug Laws

Each member of the Pitzer community is individually and personally responsible for compliance with the applicable provisions of the law of the State of California. The following codes are provided for your information:

Possession by a Person(s) Under 21 Years of Age

Any person under the age of 21 years who has any alcoholic beverage in their possession on any street or highway or in any public place open to the public is guilty of a misdemeanor (PC.25662).

In 1988 California amended Bus. & Prof. Code 25662. The amendment states that peace officers who lawfully enter premises may confiscate alcoholic beverages which are in plain view and possessed by or provided to underage persons at social gatherings. The gatherings must be open to the public, have ten or more underage persons in attendance, with those under 21 consuming alcoholic beverages and no supervision by the parent or guardian of one or more of the participants. Alcoholic beverages in open containers that are confiscated may be destroyed while those in unopened containers shall be impounded for no more than seven working days after which they too may be destroyed. Unopened containers may be released within the seven days to the owner or resident of the property provided they are 21 years of age. (Bus. & Prof. Code 25662(b))

Sales, Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor

Every person who sells, furnishes, gives, or causes to be sold, furnished, or given away any alcoholic beverage to any person under the age of 21 years is guilty of a misdemeanor (B & PC. 25658).

Any person under the age of 21 years who purchases any alcoholic beverage or any person under the age of 21 years who consumes any alcoholic beverage in any on-sale premises is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not less than one hundred dollars ($100), no part of which shall be suspended. The penalty is more severe under the Penal Code Section 272, which states if any person provides an alcoholic beverage to a minor person under 18 he/she will be contributing to the delinquency of a minor, which is also a misdemeanor. The maximum penalty for the violation of this code section is one year in the County Jail for each count and/or $1,000 fine for each count. It should be pointed out that each minor so provided with an alcoholic beverage is a separate count and may be charged by the District Attorney (PC. 272).

Sales to an Intoxicated Person

Every person who sells, furnishes, or gives alcohol to any habitual or common drunkard or to any obviously intoxicated person is guilty of a misdemeanor (25602).

False Evidence of Age and Identity

Any person under the age of 21 years who presents or offers to any licensee, his/her agent or employees, any written, printed, or photo static evidence of age which is false for the purpose of purchasing, attempting to purchase, or otherwise procuring or attempting to procure the serving of any alcoholic beverage, or who has in his possession any false or fraudulent written, printed, or photo static evidence of age and identity, is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of at least two hundred dollars, no part of which shall be suspended.

Possession in Motor Vehicle by Minor

No person under the age of 21 years shall knowingly possess, transport, or have under his/ her control in any motor vehicle any alcoholic beverage, unless such person is accompanied by a parent or legal guardian or is employed by a license under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act (Division 9, commencing with Section 23000, of the Business and Professions Code), and is possessing, transporting or has such alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle under his/her control during regular hours and in the course of his/her employment. If the vehicle used in any violation, as mentioned in the previous paragraph, is registered to such person under the age of 21 years, the vehicle may be impounded at the owner’s expense for not less than one day nor more than thirty days for each violation (VC 23224).

Marijuana 

Marijuana Possession

Health and Safety Code 11357

This is the California marijuana law that sets forth the rules for personal possession of marijuana.  Possession for personal use of not more than 28.5 grams of marijuana (a bit more than an ounce) is legal in California as of November 9, 2016, for people age 21 and older. So is possession of up to 4 grams of concentrated cannabis (hashish). 

Marijuana Cultivation

Health and Safety Code 11358 as amended by Proposition 64, allows most people who are 21 and over to cultivate up to six (6) marijuana plants. People under 21 who grow any amount of marijuana, though, are guilty of an infraction. People under 18 who cultivate marijuana illegally must attend drug counseling and perform community service. People 18 and over (but under 21) may be fined up to $100. And cultivating over six marijuana plants remains a crime. Most defendants who plant, cultivate, harvest, dry or process more than 6 living marijuana plants will be charged with a misdemeanor and face up to six (6) months in county jail and/or a fine of up to $500.

AND cultivating more than 6 marijuana plants can be charged as a California felony for the following defendants:

  • People with serious violent felonies on their record;
  • Registered sex offenders;
  • Defendants who have two (2) or more prior convictions for cultivating more than six
  • marijuana plants; and
  • Defendants who violate certain California environmental laws in their marijuana cultivation activities.

Possession for Sale of Marijuana

Proposition 64 legalized the sale of marijuana–but only for businesses that obtain and operate in accordance with a state license (and possibly local licenses as well). As a result, possession of marijuana with the intent to sell it without a license remains a crime under HS. For most adult defendants, HS 11359 possession for sale without a license is a misdemeanor, carrying the following penalties:

  • Up to six (6) months in county jail, and/or
  • A fine of up to five hundred dollars ($500).

But marijuana possession for sale without a license is a felony if any of the following is true:

  • You have a prior conviction for one of a list of particularly serious violent felonies, including murder, sexually violent offenses, sex crimes against a child under 14, or gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, or a sex crime that requires you to register as a sex offender;
  • You have two (2) or more prior misdemeanor convictions for marijuana possession for sale; or
  • You possessed marijuana for sale in connection with a knowing sale or attempted sale to someone under 18.
  • For these defendants, possessing marijuana for sale is punishable by 16 months, or two or three years in county jail. 

Proof of intent to sell marijuana without a license is usually made by circumstantial evidence. Such evidence can include:

  • a large quantity of marijuana,
  • the presence of items such as baggies and scales,
  • pot divided into multiple baggies or containers,
  • the presence of cash and/or weapons, and/or
  • the opinion of the arresting officer that the marijuana was for sale.

Transportation of Marijuana

Transportation for sale of marijuana under HS 11360 is punishable by two (2), three (3) or four (4) years in jail.  Finally, transporting marijuana without intent to sell it, or giving marijuana away, is not a crime in California so long as both of the following are true:

You transport or give away not more than 28.5 grams of marijuana or eight grams of concentrated cannabis, and

Any people you give marijuana to are 21 years of age or older.

Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

It is unlawful to possess an opium pipe or any device, contrivance, instrument or paraphernalia used for unlawfully injecting or smoking a controlled substance or a controlled substance, which is classified as a narcotic drug (Sec. 11364).

Controlled Substances

Unauthorized Possession of Controlled Substances

Except as otherwise provided every person who possesses (1) any controlled substance (as classified) or (2) any controlled substance (as classified) which is a narcotic drug, unless upon the written prescription of a physician, dentist, podiatrist, or veterinarian licensed to practice in this state, shall be punished by imprisonment in state prison for a period of not less than two years or more than ten years and shall not be eligible for release upon completion of sentence or on parole or any other basis until she/he has been imprisoned for a period of not less than two years in the state prison (Sec. 11350).

Possession for Sale of Controlled Substances

Except at otherwise provided every person who possesses for sale (1) any controlled substance (as classified) or (2) any controlled substance (as classified) which is a narcotic drug,  shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a period of not less than five years or more than fifteen years and shall not be eligible for release upon completion of sentence or on parole or any other basis until she/he has been imprisoned for a period of not less than two and a half years in the state prison (Sec. 11351).

Transportation of Controlled Substances

Except as otherwise provided, every person who transports, imports into this state, sells, furnishes, administers or gives away, or offers to transport, import into this state, sell, furnish, administer, or give away, or attempts to import into this state or transport (1) any controlled substance (as classified) or (2) any controlled substance (as classified) which is a narcotic drug  unless upon the written prescription of a physician, dentist, podiatrist, or veterinarian licensed to practice in this state, shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a period of five years to life and shall not be eligible for release upon completion of sentence, or parole or any other basis until she/he has been imprisoned for a period of not less than three years in the state prison (Sec. 11352).

Possession with Intention to Manufacture Methamphetamine (PCP)

(PCP) Any person who possesses both methylamine and phenyhl-2propanone (phenyl acetone) at the same time with the intent to manufacture methamphetamine is guilty of a felony and shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for between one and five years (Sec. 11383).

Federal law prohibits the possession and distribution of controlled substances, including marijuana, cocaine and heroin. Persons found guilty of possession of controlled substances face a federal civil penalty of $10,000 and a criminal sanction of $5,000 and not more than one year in jail. Federal criminal penalties for possession of controlled substances increase according to the amount possessed.

Drugs Risks and Consequences

  • Alcohol and other drug use during pregnancy increases risk of physical harms to the fetus.
  • Additional risks of harm may occur from toxic impurities present in street drugs.
  • Additional risks of harm may occur from the use of prescription drugs in ways other than prescribed.
  • Drugs taken by injection can increase the risk of infection (e.g. HIV, hepatitis, etc.) through needle contamination.

For more information visit: www.drugabuse.gov

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California Law Regarding Hate Crimes

California law prohibits hate crimes. Section 422.6 of the California Penal Code defines a hate crime as follows:

  1. “Hate crime” means a criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of one or more of the following actual or perceived characteristics of the victim:
  1. Disability.

  2. Gender.

  3. Nationality.

  4. Race or ethnicity.

  5. Religion.

  6. Sexual orientation.

  7. Association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics.

  1. “Hate crime” includes, but is not limited to, a violation of Penal Code Section 422.6. California Penal Code A7 422.6 provides the following:
  1. No person, whether or not acting under color of law, shall by force or threat of force, willfully injure, intimidate, interfere with, oppress, or threaten any other person in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him or her by the Constitution or laws of this state or by the Constitution or laws of the United States in whole or in part because of one or more of the actual or perceived characteristics of the victim listed in subdivision (a) of Section 422.55.
  2. No person, whether or not acting under color of law, shall knowingly deface, damage, or destroy the real or personal property of any other person for the purpose of intimidating or interfering with the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to the other person by the Constitution or laws of this state or by the Constitution or laws of the United States, in whole or in part because of one or more of the actual or perceived characteristics of the victim listed in subdivision (a) of Section 422.55.
  3. Any person convicted of violating subdivision (a) or (b) shall be punished by imprisonment in a county jail not to exceed one year, or by a fine not to exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000), or by both the above imprisonment and fine, and the court shall order the defendant to perform a minimum of community service, not to exceed 400 hours, to be performed over a period not to exceed 350 days, during a time other than his or her hours of employment or school attendance. However, no person may be convicted of violating subdivision (a) based upon speech alone, except upon a showing that the speech itself threatened violence against a specific person or group of persons and that the defendant had the apparent ability to carry out the threat.
  4. Conduct that violates this and any other provision of law, including, but not limited to, an offense described in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11410) of Chapter 3 of Title 1 of Part 4, may be charged under all applicable provisions. However, an act or omission punishable in different ways by this section and other provisions of law shall not be punished under more than one provision, and the penalty to be imposed shall be determined as set forth in Section 654.

Communication Protocol for Bias-Related Incidents

  1. Any person, including faculty, staff, students and visitors to the colleges, observing an incident or evidence of possible bias incident and/or hate crime shall notify college staff and/or Campus Safety before taking any action (such as disposing or removing evidence, altering scene, etc.).

  2. College staff and/or Campus Safety shall follow protocol of college where the incident occurred and with student(s) immediately involved in notifying appropriate on-call staff.

  3. Campus Safety and the on-call dean(s) will consult on bias related incidents that may rise to the level of a crime. If either suspects that a crime may have been committed, Campus Safety shall notify Claremont Police Department.

  4. Campus Safety and/or College personnel shall document the incident or evidence by appropriate means, e.g.: photograph(s), incident reports, statements from witnesses, etc.

  5. The Dean of Students shall preserve the evidence or copies of same. In incidents of a criminal nature, or where otherwise deemed appropriate, Campus Safety shall also maintain records of the incident.

  6. Communication among the colleges will pass from the Chief Student Affairs Officer or the Chief Administrative Officer of the institution where the incident occurred to the Chief Student Affairs Officers on other campuses and Chief Administrative Officer at TCC.

In the event that the Chief Student Affairs or Administrative Officer is unavailable, she or he will have designated a second in command to whom the communication will be directed. The second in command is then responsible for both implementing the below protocol and informing the Chief Student Affairs or Administrative Officer as quickly as possible.

The communication between offices should:

  • Provide a brief description of the incident;
  • List any information about initial steps that have been taken to address the incident;
  • Provide instructions about how to report information about the incident;
    and
  • Conclude with a standard paragraph on steps community members should take in the event they see a bias related incident.
  1. Each school and TCC shall create and/or follow an established internal policy to communicate information regarding the incident. A campus might choose to include one or more of the following:
  1. Notification procedures for personnel responsible for the handling the incident are in place, including communications officers Email/and or Web dissemination of the notification to all faculty, staff and students;
  2. Paper mail dissemination of the notification to all faculty, staff and students;
  3. Posting of notices in locations on the campus in areas in which members of that campus are most likely to read them;
  4. Utilizing RA’s, proctors, college councils or senates, and other student leaders in ways consistent with their position description and responsibilities;
  5. Notifying any other appropriate college- specific body at that institution that may be charged with handling matters of this nature- Diversity Coordinating Committee at Scripps, IRT at Pomona, Emergency Operations Committee(s) (EOC) of college, etc.
  6. Utilizing informational sessions for community members to receive information in person, ask questions and generally discuss incident.
  1. Each institution will insure that Residence Life staff members are instructed about response protocols for such incidents

  2. Each institution will provide information to its community about reporting protocols.

  3. TCC will insure that Campus Safety officers and dispatchers are instructed about response protocols for such incidents.

  4. The chief student affairs and administrative officer will keep a log of incident communications originating from their institution. The log shall include a description of each incident and the institutional and/or police response to the incident. This log may be kept in the format appropriate to the campus culture (paper, web-based, etc.) The log will be made available to students, faculty and/or staff upon request.

This protocol was drafted and adopted by the Student Affairs Committee of The Claremont Colleges, PASA (Pan-African Student Association), Scripps College Wanawake Weusi, Hillel Student Board, Pitzer Black Student Union (BSU) in Spring 2005.

This protocol was adopted by the Council of The Claremont Colleges on June 2, 2005.

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The Claremont Colleges Policy on AIDS

The Claremont Colleges Policy on AIDS The Claremont Colleges do not discriminate on the grounds that a student has or is suspected to have AIDS, ARC, HIV, or a positive HTLV-III antibody test. This policy applies to the admission process, academic life, and co-curricular life, including access to dining halls, athletic and recreational facilities, student centers, and living arrangements. Claremont College students can get tested for HIV at Student Health Services and Health Education Outreach. Additionally, The Claremont Colleges offer medical and counseling assistance on HIV/AIDS at Student Health Services and the Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services. Please contact the Dean of Students Office for further information and counsel regarding questions pertaining to HIV/AIDS.

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The Claremont Colleges Banning Policy

Background

The Claremont Colleges are composed of seven institutions of higher education, including The Claremont Graduate University, Claremont McKenna College, Harvey Mudd College, the Keck Graduate Institute, Pitzer College, Pomona College, and Scripps College. For the purpose of this policy, the Claremont University Consortium shall also be considered part of The Claremont Colleges, as well as any property owned or rented by The Claremont Colleges that is located away from the home campuses. As institutions of higher education, The Claremont Colleges share a common purpose of providing an educational experience that is, among other things, safe from harm, fosters personal growth, and is intellectually enlightening. The need to protect individual institutions and The Claremont Colleges from harm to its community members and assets is therefore a very high priority. Balanced against this priority is the need to protect free speech and academic freedom. The Claremont Colleges must comply with all legal requirements of the United States and the state of California when taking steps to protect community members and assets.

Policy

In the event of a threat to the safety or well-being of an individual, group, or member institution of The Claremont Colleges, each institution reserves the right to prohibit disruptive or potentially dangerous persons from their campuses. The Claremont Colleges further agree to consult with each other about such individuals and, with permission, extend the ban to cover any or all of the member institutions and their functions. The authority for this policy emanates from each institution’s right to control its own property, and authority for coordination between The Claremont Colleges occurs through agreement among the presidents of the colleges. Under normal circumstances, the deans of students, the director of campus safety, or the vice president for student affairs of The Claremont University Consortium shall be the designated officials who are responsible for the banning of disruptive or potentially dangerous persons from campus. Other designated officials may be expected to carry out these duties, as determined by the president(s) of the institution(s). The designated official who is assigned to review any potentially disruptive or dangerous situation may exercise emergency power, including issuing an immediate ban, to respond to a threat. These actions shall be reasonable and narrowly tailored to fit the event. The designated official may also issue a ban as the result of an investigation, with the opportunity for all parties to be heard, which leads the official to conclude that illegal activity, disruption, or the threat of harm to others or property has or may have occurred. The official may also ban an individual if there is reason to suspect that illegal activity, disruption, or the threat of harm to others or property is increasingly likely to occur in the future. Bans from one or more of The Claremont Colleges may be temporary or permanent and shall clearly indicate their length and scope to the person who has been banned. This policy does not preclude The Claremont Colleges from taking criminal, civil, or restraining action against individuals. The following procedures provide guidelines to be used by the designated official to ban an individual from the campus, property, or function of the college or colleges. These procedures do not apply to faculty or staff.

Procedures Governing Individuals with or without a Relationship to The Claremont Colleges

  1. Regarding Individuals with No Direct Connection to The Claremont Colleges: This set of procedures applies to individuals who have never been a student of The Claremont Colleges; do not have a spouse or partner who is an employee or volunteer at The Claremont Colleges; and are not parents or guardians of a current or former student of The Claremont Colleges. Each designated official has the authority to issue a ban on behalf of one or more of The Claremont Colleges. A ban of this type is communicated to all other student deans, and a copy of the ban letter shall be sent to the director of campus safety.

  2. Regarding Individuals with a Connection to One of The Claremont Colleges or The Claremont University Consortium: This set of procedures applies to alumni; former students who are not currently enrolled; spouses or partners of an employee, part-time employee, or volunteer; those performing volunteer work; and parents or guardians of current or former students. The designated official initiating the ban shall send a message to all other deans of students to determine if there is any objection to banning the individual in question. Any dean raising an objection may choose not to have his/her campus covered by the ban. If no concerns are raised within 48 hours, the initiating official may apply the ban to cover all The Claremont Colleges’ properties.

  3. Regarding Current Students: This set of procedures applies to any student who is currently enrolled at one of The Claremont Colleges, including when the colleges are in or out of session. It is within the authority of the banning campuses and CUC to make this decision without regard to judicial proceedings at the home campus.

    1. How the Ban of a Current Student Applies to Colleges: Unless otherwise specified, the banned student shall be permitted to attend classes and use relevant academic resources on campus but suspended from all other activities
    2. How the Ban of a Current Student Applies to the Claremont University Consortium: Depending upon the circumstances of the individual student, the vice president for student affairs shall determine, in consultation with individual CUC services and the dean of students at the college at which the student is enrolled, the scope and extent of the ban from CUC services and property. The student shall normally be permitted to make appointments at CUC offices and services as needed. For drop-in services that a student might utilize (i.e., OBSA, CLSA, chaplains), the vice president for student affairs shall decide, based on the circumstances giving rise to the ban, whether drop-in privileges shall continue or if the banned student shall be required to schedule appointments. Generally, banned students shall be permitted to use Honnold Library and the Huntley Bookstore, although CUC reserves the right to limit and/or suspend privileges where circumstances warrant such action. Circumstances under which a student might be restricted from bookstore and/or library usage include, but are not limited to, students who appear to pose a threat to the health, safety, or welfare of other patrons and/or theft from the facility.

Requests for Review, Modification or Removal of a Ban

A person banned from one or more of The Claremont Colleges may request that the banning party discuss the nature of the ban, modify the ban, or withdraw the ban. It is the responsibility of the banned person to contact the official who first initiated the ban to request a conversation about the ban within five business days. It is also the responsibility of the banned person to bring any substantive changes to the attention of the banning official in order to request reconsideration. For current students who have been banned, the home campus dean of students should review the ban policy and appeals process with the student. Changes to any ban will be communicated to the other designated officials for their consideration relevant to the person’s status on their respective campuses.

Effective Date and Application of This Policy to New Institutions

Should additional institutions formally join The Claremont Colleges, this policy shall automatically apply to those institutions upon incorporation, including their property in Claremont and elsewhere.

Date of Approval by the Council of The Claremont Colleges: April 2011

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Computer and Network Policies and Procedures

Computer Use Agreement

Use of your computer accounts and related services is a privilege. By accepting and using your Pitzer Network account, you have agreed to obey the rules and policies of the Pitzer Information Technology Department including the Appropriate Use Policy of the Claremont Colleges. Failure to follow these rules will result in the loss of this privilege.

  • Users of Pitzer College computer resources are required to follow lab rules.
  • Users will only use one computer at a time.
  • Each user is assigned an individual account. Users will only use their own account. Users will be expected to show some form of identification to verify their identity when acquiring their account.
  • The user is responsible for choosing a password during their first session and for maintaining its security (users may choose to change their password periodically). By policy students are required to change their password regularly in accordance with password expiration policy.
  • The computer accounts of other users are private. Any person(s) copying from another user’s files without their permission may lose their network & computer privileges.
  • Users misrepresenting themselves while using any of Pitzer’s computer resources will not be tolerated. This refers specially to sending email messages using a falsified name or someone else’s account.
  • Unauthorized use of the computer network, including but not limited to attempting to break into other systems will not be tolerated. Disciplinary action will be taken.
  • All changes to the content or configurations of any system or computer MUST first be cleared with either the System Manager or the Lab Supervisor. This includes adding and running any programs or software outside of the established supported software. (i.e. games).
  • Users of the system are subject to federal, state and local laws.
  • Violation of copyright laws will not be tolerated. Illegal downloading of music, video’s, software or other copyrighted material is not allowed and all such files will be removed. Network access can be revoked.
  • Users should follow any reasonable instructions given by the consultant on duty. Any complaints regarding a user should be forwarded in writing or via email to the Lab Supervisor.
  • Users are not permitted to let friends and/or relatives use their accounts. Anyone violating this is subject to having his or her privileges revoked. Limited guest accounts can be requested and will be provided at the discretion of the Lab Supervisor.
  • Use of any Pitzer College technology resource for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited.
  • Computer resources may not be used to engage in abuse of other users, such as sending abusive or obscene messages within or beyond Pitzer via the network.
  • Users are responsible for their own data. All files should be saved to a removable storage device or to the user’s networked home directory. All files stored locally on lab computers will be removed as computers are cleaned on a regular basis.
  • Abusive or improper use of computer resources is not allowed. This includes, but is not limited to, misuse of system operator privileges, tampering with equipment, unauthorized attempts at repairing equipment and unauthorized removal of equipment or components.

The priority protocol for use of lab computers is:

  • Any faculty or staff member of Pitzer College who has reserved time for teaching a class in the lab.
  • Any Information Technology staff member doing work related to their position.
  • Any student of Pitzer College who are engaged in “academic activities.”
  • Any faculty or staff members of Pitzer College performing non-teaching work for the college.
  • Any student, faculty, or staff member of any of the other Claremont Colleges who has his or her own valid account.

Note: “Academic activities” is defined as research, class use and class assignments.

The Claremont Colleges Policy Regarding Appropriate Use of Campus Computing and Network Resources

An overall guiding mission of The Claremont Colleges is education in an environment where the free exchange of ideas is encouraged and protected. The Claremont Colleges make available computing and network facilities (CNF) resources for use by the Colleges’ students, faculty and staff. These services are provided for educational purposes and to carry out the legitimate business of the Colleges. The Colleges and members of the college communities are expected to observe Federal, State and local laws that govern computer and telecommunications use, as well as the Colleges’ regulations and policies.

Computing and network facilities resources users are required to use these resources within the Colleges’ standards of conduct. Individuals with expert knowledge of information systems or who make extensive use of these facilities, or with a position of trust regarding these facilities will be held accountable to a higher standard.

Responsible, considerate and ethical behavior expected by the Colleges extends to use of computing and network facilities resources and networks throughout the world to which electronic access has been provided. These CNF resources include but are not limited to:

  • Computers and associated peripheral devices;
  • Campus video cable;
  • Classroom presentation systems;
  • Voice messaging equipment;
  • Data networking equipment systems, including remote and wireless access;
  • Computer software;
  • Electronically stored institutional data and messages;
  • All other similar resources owned, controlled and/or operated by the Colleges; and
  • Services to maintain these resources.

Ownership: The Colleges retain absolute ownership rights of the CNF resources. Such resources are not owned by a department or by any individual. CNF resources leased, licensed, or purchased under research contracts or grants, are administered under the terms of this policy for as long as they remain within the lawful possession or control of the Colleges. CNF resources provided to on-campus residences are also owned, operated and provided by the Colleges.

Access to Resource: Access to CNF resources is a privilege, which is allowed only to the Colleges’ authorized personnel and students. All users must understand and abide by the responsibilities that come with the privilege of use. Such responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. You must understand and comply with all applicable federal, state and local laws.

  2. You must not intentionally seek information about, browse, copy, or modify non-public files belonging to other people, whether at a Claremont College or elsewhere.

  3. You are authorized to use only computer resources and information to which you have legitimately been granted access. Sharing your passwords with others is expressly forbidden. Any attempt to gain unauthorized access to any computer system, resource or information is expressly forbidden. If you encounter or observe a gap in system or network security, immediately report the gap to the manager of that system.

  4. Each College’s Policy on Harassment applies as equally to electronic displays and communications as to the more traditional (e.g., oral and written) means of display and communication.

  5. Messages, sentiments and declarations sent as electronic mail or postings must meet the same standards for distribution or display as physical (paper) documents would on college property.

  6. Unsolicited mailings and unauthorized mass mailings from campus networks or computing resources (i.e., “spam”) are prohibited. Each campus may have specific policies regarding the use of existing group mailing lists (e.g., all- students or all-faculty). Contact your campus IT organization for details regarding these policies.

  7. Spoofing, or attempts to spoof or falsify email, network or other information used to identify the source, destination or other information about a communication, data or information is prohibited.

  8. You must not degrade computing or network performance in any way that could prevent others from meeting their educational or College business goals.

  9. You must conform to laws and Colleges policies regarding protection of intellectual property, including laws and policies regarding copyright, patents and trademarks. When the content and distribution of an electronic communication would exceed fair use as defined by the Federal Copyright Act of 1976, users of campus computing or networking resources shall secure appropriate permission to distribute protected material in any form, including text, photographic images, audio, video, graphic illustrations, and computer software.

  10. You must not use campus computing or networking resources or personal computing resources accessed through campus network facilities to collect, store or distribute information or materials, or to participate in activities that are in violation of federal, state or local laws.

  11. You must not use campus computing or networking resources or personal computing resources accessed through campus network facilities to collect, store or distribute information or materials in violation of other Colleges policies or guidelines. These include, but are not limited to, policies and guidelines regarding intellectual property and sexual or other forms of harassment.

  12. You must not create or willfully disseminate computer viruses. You must employ appropriate virus protection methods to avoid damaging CNF resources.

  13. Use of CNF resources for advertising, selling and soliciting is prohibited without the prior written consent of the Colleges, and use of CNF resources for commercial purposes or for personal financial gain is prohibited. Faculty, students or staff who have questions about the legitimacy of a particular use should discuss it with the appropriate members of the IT staff on their home campus.

  14. The disclosure of individually identifiable non-directory information to non-university personnel is protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). The disclosure of financial or personnel records that are owned by the Colleges without permission or to unauthorized persons is not permitted and may be prosecuted under California Penal Code 502.

  15. Willful or unauthorized misuse or disclosure of information owned by the Colleges will also constitute just cause for disciplinary action, including dismissal from school and/ or termination of employment regardless of whether criminal or civil penalties are imposed. It is also expected that any user will report suspected abuses of CNF resources. Failure to do so may subject the individual to loss of CNF access and/or the disciplinary action referred to above.

The respective Information Technology organization of one of The Claremont Colleges may immediately suspend service to an individual or computer found to be significantly degrading the usability of the network or other computer systems. Inappropriate use will be referred to the appropriate College authority to take action, which may result in dismissal from school and/or termination of employment.

Password/Security Codes: Individuals entrusted with or that inadvertently discover logins and passwords are expected to guard them responsibly. These passwords are not to be shared with others. The same policy applies to door codes for restricted-access rooms/areas. Those who need logins or door codes can make a formal request to the administrator of those codes/passwords.

Note: The provisions of this Policy apply to the institutions comprising The Claremont Colleges. (rev. 6/27/02)

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Demonstrations

The undergraduate Claremont Colleges, Pomona College, Scripps College, Claremont McKenna College, Harvey Mudd College, Pitzer College together with Claremont Graduate University, Keck Graduate Institute and The Claremont Colleges (TCC) are all member institutions of the “Claremont Colleges.” Each of these member institutions respects the rights of free speech and peaceful assembly and supports their exercise. However, when the exercise of speech and assembly becomes disruptive or non-peaceful, and infringes upon the rights of others, threatens property or public safety, or impedes the business of the member Colleges or TCC, the individuals and TCC will act according to this policy.

Temporary props or visual displays that accompany a demonstration and require installation must be reviewed and approved by Facilities and Grounds before review by the Office of Student Affairs. Facilities and Grounds will not review the content of the prop or display but will review the installation location and inspect the proposed prop or display for structural soundness and overall health and safety. No temporary prop or visual display may violate College policy. Permanent installations must follow the policies and procedures of the Public Art Policy.

Every institution in The Claremont Colleges has instituted procedures for presenting and peacefully resolving disagreements about policies. Officials at the individual Claremont Colleges and TCC are willing to examine, discuss and explain institutional policies to any member of The Claremont Colleges community. However, participation in a demonstration that is materially disruptive and non-peaceful or involves the substantial disorder or invasion of the rights of others on the property of any of The Claremont Colleges or their affiliated institutions is prohibited.

Determination of when a demonstration or action is non-peaceful or disruptive may be difficult, but The Claremont Colleges individually and collectively subscribe to the general guidelines listed below.

  • Non-peaceful actions or demonstrations are those that endanger or injure or threaten to endanger or injure, any person, or that damage or threaten to damage property
  • Disruptive actions or demonstrations are those that restrict free movement on any of the campuses, or interfere with, or impede access to, regular activities or facilities of any of the Colleges or TCC.

If an officer or designee of an affected College or TCC informs individuals in a given area that their collective actions are judged non-peaceful or disruptive and that they should disperse, individuals remaining may be charged, on their home campus, with a violation of this policy.

Any individual action in a non-peaceful or disruptive manner, whether they are acting individually or within a group, may be charged on the basis of the individual’s or group’s behavior with a violation of this policy. Ignorance of this policy or lack of intent to violate this policy is not acceptable justification for violating it. Lack of intent or lack of awareness of the existence of College or Consortium policy will not excuse violations. Charges will be brought at the home college of the accused.

Any President on their home campus, or designee, or the Chief Executive Officer of TCC, or designee, on the property of TCC, is authorized to take action against any individual violating this policy. Actions may include arrest, or other legal action, or notice of disciplinary charges and handled through the home college’s disciplinary procedures. The Presidents and the Chief Executive Officer of TCC may delegate their authority to act.

Enforcement Policy: In the event of a nonpeaceful or disruptive action on the property of any of The Claremont Colleges, TCC, or any of their affiliated offices or programs, the affected College or Colleges or The Claremont Colleges will act according to the following procedures:

  1. The President(s) of the College(s) where activities are disrupted or the Chief Executive Officer of TCC, in the case of the property of TCC, will determine whether or not negotiation will take place with those involved in the demonstration or disruption. S/he will also determine the actions to be taken including, but not limited to, provisional or summary suspension or arrest.

  2. The Colleges and TCC agree that cases of student disruption or non-peaceful action normally will be treated as violation of the student’s home campus conduct code and will be adjudicated by the normal disciplinary process at the student’s home college. Appropriate officials at the affected institution(s) may put disruptive or non-peaceful individuals on notice that they are in violation of this policy and file charges against them. Officials at the home campus agree to acknowledge requests for disciplinary action-including requests for suspension-and take action that is consistent with and/or allowed by disciplinary procedures at the home campus.

  3. Officials at the other campuses will promptly provide assistance in identifying disruptive or nonpeaceful individuals to the campus where the disruption occurs or to TCC.

  4. All individuals who engage in disruptive or non-peaceful action will be notified that they are trespassing. Persons who continue to trespass after notification are subject to arrest (by a Peace Officer or by Private Person, California Penal Code Section 834).

  5. Individual Claremont Colleges and TCC may bill students or file civil suits to recover damage and costs.

  6. While officials at affected colleges or TCC may temporarily revoke any or all student privileges or take steps to end disruptive or non-peaceful protests, the college at which the student is enrolled, and only that college, may adjudicate complaints and make final decisions about alleged violations of conduct, apart from those decisions made by a court of law.

Approved by the Council of The Claremont Colleges, November 7, 2001.

This policy is not to be amended or changed without approval of the Council

On January 1, 2018, the legal name of Claremont University Consortium was changed to The Claremont Colleges, Inc. When “Claremont University Consortium” appears in this document, the references are to The Claremont Colleges, Inc. or to The Claremont Colleges Services.

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Discrimination, Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policies and Procedures

See separate section  


Event Registration & Hosting Guidelines

Pitzer College aims to promote a lively and varied social life within our community. Student-sponsored events play an important role in Pitzer’s campus life. The principal goal of a student-sponsored event should be to enhance campus life. Events should focus on the greater campus community and not be used exclusively as an opportunity to showcase band talent or focus primarily on alcohol. The following guidelines are intended to facilitate such events safely and in accordance with Pitzer policies. Students wishing to register and host events on campus are encouraged to make responsible choices while minimizing high-risk behaviors.

Overview

To help students host responsible and safe events, the Pitzer requires that most student-sponsored events held on campus be registered with the Assistant Dean of Campus Life (hereafter referred to as “Assistant Dean”) and the Pitzer Events Board, a committee of Student Senate. Student events which should be registered include:

  • Student events requesting major amplified sound;
  • Student events requesting to serve alcohol; and
  • Student events with an anticipated attendance of over 100 people.

NOTE: If students desire to host an event in a residence hall suite, they must register the event with the Residence Director of their living area. All other event registrations for student-sponsored events go through the Assistant Dean and Pitzer Events Board.

Event Registration

To register an event, the event registrant must complete an “Event Registration Form,” located on the Student Senate website under “Events Board” and then attend a Pitzer Events Board meeting in which Campus Life staff will be in attendance. The Campus Life staff may request a follow-up registration meeting. The purpose of attending the Events Board meeting and any subsequent registration meetings is to discuss the planned event, review the Event Hosting and Registration Guidelines, discuss risk management issues, determine the approved amount of event staff, security, and alcohol and servers (if applicable) and inform the event registrants of any additional approvals needed to host a registered event.

Event Types

Events that need to be registered will fall into at least one of the following categories and must be registered in advance according to the time frames indicated.

  • Events in the evening: Events that occur in the evening hours that are anticipated to occur between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. (weekdays) or 8 p.m. and 1 a.m. (weekends).
  • Events with 100+ people anticipated: Events that the registrant anticipates having over 100 people or is publicized widely enough to likely draw over 100 people. 
    Note: Unless otherwise stated, all registered events are open to Pitzer students, their guests, and 5C students.
  • Events with amplified sound: Events that utilize the event staff sound equipment or outside sound engineering equipment.
  • Events at which alcohol is served: Events at which alcohol has been requested to be served and have been approved by Campus Life staff.
  • Events that desire to seek event funding from the Pitzer Events Board: Student Senate has allocated a sum of funding for the Events Board to distribute for on-campus (Pitzer and 5C) social events.

Registration Timeline: Students desiring to register an event should fill out an Event Registration Form online at least two weeks before the intended event date, although the Pitzer Events Calendar fills up, so the earlier the better. This registration timeline allows for scheduling event staff, Campus Safety (if applicable), facility reservations, and successfully publicizing the event.

Event Management

During the Pitzer Events Board meeting in which your event proposal is being reviewed, Campus Life staff will review the event management issues and needs, including: event staff, Campus Safety, restroom facilities, fencing, etc. An event walkthrough meeting with Campus Life staff and the event registrant may also be required to review safety and overall event management plans.

Event Staff: Event Staff is a group of Pitzer students committed to helping their peers host successful on-campus events, including sound mixing, helping with fencing, and serving alcohol. Depending on the nature of the student-sponsored event, event staff will be present to assist. If an event is approved to have alcohol, event staff servers will be required and it is the responsibility of the event registrant to pay the server fee (addressed in the “Alcohol” section below). Events held Sunday through Thursday must end by 11 p.m. and events held on Friday or Saturday must end by 1 a.m. unless otherwise restricted.  Payment for Event Staff is the responsibility of the event registrant’s sponsoring organization.  

Campus Safety: Campus Safety will likely be required at student-sponsored events that are classified in two or more of the following ways: evening events, 100+ people anticipated, using amplified sound, alcohol is being served. The amount of officers required will be determined by the Campus Life staff based on the type and nature of the event being registered. If a recurring event has had a successful pattern of management, an exception may be made to the requirement to hire officer(s). Payment for Campus Safety is the responsibility of the event registrant’s sponsoring organization.

Fencing: Fencing may be required for events held outside with a significant expected attendance. The type of fencing and the fencing plan will be reviewed and approved during the registration meeting, if applicable. Payment for fencing is the responsibility of the event registrant’s sponsoring organization.

Restroom Facilities: Public restrooms must be available for all registered events without the need for key card access. Public restrooms are those which are available to all attendees regardless of gender identity and do not require attendees to select a restroom based on traditional limitations imposed by gender and/or sex definitions. If appropriate public restrooms are not available for the nature of the event being registered, portable restrooms may be required. Payment for portable restrooms is the responsibility of the event registrant’s sponsoring organization.

Event Registrants

The institutional resources provided by Campus Life to support events are exclusively for event registrants working in collaboration with one or more Pitzer club/organization. Individuals wishing to start a new event need to connect with a club/organization before proceeding. Collaboration will foster greater support and additional human resources. All events must have an event registrant who is responsible for meeting with the Pitzer Events Board and Campus Life staff, registering the event, and be present at the event. The event registrant must also have a co-registrant that is present at the event. If the primary event registrant desires to serve alcohol, they must have a co-registrant that is 21-years of age for the request for alcohol to be considered. Hosting an event is a privilege and significant responsibility. Only students in good academic and social standing with the College are permitted to register and host events. Students who have made poor decisions regarding their behavior on campus are encouraged to address these issues before requesting to register and host an event.

Event Registrants are expected to:

  • Be present for vendor deliveries, event set-up, the duration of the event, and for the clean-up of the event.
  • Not be intoxicated at or consume alcohol during the event.
  • Ensure that the event and guests comply with Pitzer policy and local, state, and federal laws. If violations are found, the event registrants will be expected to address the situation immediately.
  • Seek help from Campus Safety if unable to safely manage or oversee the event. This includes ending an event early if, in consultation with Campus Safety or Campus Life staff, it is determined to be necessary to ensure the safety of guests.
  • Ensure that noise stays within a reasonable level. If a noise complaint is received by Campus Safety, the event registrants will be notified and will be expected to have the volume lowered. If a second complaint is received, Campus Safety may require the event be ended. Note: If a local law enforcement agency receives a noise complaint, they may respond to campus and issue a citation. If a citation is issued it will be given to the event registrants who will be responsible.
  • Clean up the event location immediately following the event and return it to its pre-event condition. This includes removing all decorations and returning all furniture to its original location. If it is determined that additional custodial service is required following an event, the event registrants will be billed for that service.
  • Ensure that all borrowed equipment or supplies are returned in a timely manner and in the same condition in which they were borrowed.

Event Publicity and Alcohol

There are many ways to publicize your event besides the usual mass emails and posting of flyers. You can use word-of-mouth, table tents, sidewalk chalk, message boards, social networking media, etc. Be creative, but please observe the posting publicity guidelines, designated public posting locations and procedures at Pitzer and the other colleges, which were developed to provide effective publicity, while using a minimum of natural resources.

Some posting reminders for flyers, posters and banners:

  • Need to be approved with a stamp by the Office of Student Affairs (Scott Hall) prior to posting on campus.
  • Need to have the following information: name(s) of the sponsoring organizations/people, title of the event, date/time/location of the event, and contact information of event host.
  • Postings for events cannot include pictures or references to alcohol, nor can they promote the availability or consumption of alcohol.

Alcohol at Events

Student-sponsored events with alcohol may only be approved for Friday and Saturday. The decision to serve alcohol at a student-sponsored event will be based on staffing, availability of security, the nature of the event, the location of the event, and event scheduling. Individuals may not bring their own alcohol to any student-sponsored events.

Amount

  • Beer and wine are the only alcohol that Campus Life staff will register. No hard alcohol is allowed to be served.
  • All registered alcohol must be served in cups.
  • Only students and guests 21 years of age or older with valid forms of identification may consume registered alcohol.
  • The determination of the amount of alcohol that will be approved for a student-sponsored event will be based off the number of expected guests 21-years of age or older, the length of the event, and the venue/location. The approved amount will be the equivalent of one drink per hour per guest 21 years of age or older, for the duration of the event.
  • If alcohol is approved to be served at a student-sponsored event, no more than one keg or equivalent servings of wine will be approved for the event.
  • The number of student-sponsored events with alcohol cannot exceed more than one per weekend.
  • All student-sponsored events approved to serve alcohol must also provide high-quality non-alcoholic beverages (e.g. water, juice, soda, etc.) and high-quality food (e.g. veggies and dip, fruit platters, cheese and crackers, etc.) throughout the duration of the event.
  • Alcohol provided at the event is not allowed to leave that event.

Servers

  • If alcohol is approved to be served at a student-sponsored event, two official servers or one official server and one designated event staff are required.
  • Servers must be on Campus Life’s approved list and must have gone through the approved TIPS training.
  • Servers may not be intoxicated at or consume alcohol during an event.
  • The servers must follow the guidelines of the Pitzer College Alcohol Policy when working at events. If it is found the servers are not following policy, the service of alcohol will cease for the duration of the event.
  • Servers do not check IDs. A Campus Safety officer must be employed to check forms of identification for students wishing to consume alcohol.

Funding

  • If approved to serve alcohol at a student-sponsored event, the club/organization collaborating on the event is responsible for the cost of hiring the appropriate number of Campus Safety officers, event staff, and servers for the entire duration of the event. If the event runs late or officers are needed to disperse attendees at the end, the club/organization will incur the cost of the additional time. 
    • The cost of Campus Safety officers is dictated by the Campus Safety department and changes annually. 
    • The cost of the servers is 2 times the hourly state minimum wage
    • The cost of event staff is the CA state minimum wage per hour.
  • Student activity funds (i.e. clubs or similar funding) cannot be used to purchase alcohol.

5C Guest Pass Policies for Event Attendance

All student-sponsored events at the Claremont Colleges require 5C students and guests to follow their home institutions guest policies outlined below.

Pitzer College

  • All Pitzer student-sponsored events are open to Pitzer students, 5C students, and guests of students.
  • 5C students must have their ID from their home institution.
  • Guests of 5C students must have a valid photo ID.
  • 5C student hosts are responsible for the behavior of their guests while on campus.

Harvey Mudd College

  • Guests must be 18 years or older.
  • Only 1 registered guest per HMC student.
  • Guest list is closed at 12:01 a.m. on the day of the party, which is a Google form that is emailed to students-l@hmc.edu. No additional guest may be added after the closing of guest list.
  • Student event staff and/or campus safety handle the guest list at the party. Host must be present with guest at party entrance, and guest must have picture ID. Guests receive a guest wristband that validate that they are checked in. Hosts are responsible for their guests’ actions at the event.
  • Guests must wear wristbands at all times while in party or on HMC campus.

Claremont McKenna College

  • Students may register their guests using the electronic guest list that is facilitated by ASCMC prior to an event.
  • Guests must have a photo ID and remain with their guests at all times.

Pomona College

  • Smith Campus Center Building Managers will be the only authorized source of Event Guest Passes for events at Pomona.
  • When registering a guest, the host and guest must both be present and have picture IDs available.
  • The guest will have their photo taken by the SCC Building Manager.
  • The Building Manager will be available to register guests on Friday and Saturday nights from 6 p.m.-10 p.m.

Scripps College

  • When registering a guest at the SARLO office for a 5-C event, the Scripps host and guest must both be present and have picture IDs available for photocopying.

  • The SAS Student Activities Chair and the 5C Events Chair and/or their designee will register 5C hosts and guests for large SAS sponsored 5C events where alcohol may be served. SAS representatives will record the name of the host, the name of the college the host attends, check IDs for both persons, and obtain a cellphone number for the 5C event. Upon completion of the registration process, a pass and/or wristband will be given to the guest with specific instructions. All 5C guest passes must be requested prior to the day of the event.

  • The guest should attend the Scripps 5C event with their host. If the host leaves the Scripps 5C event, the guest should leave the event as well. In the event a guest of a 5C student is asked to leave the event, the host will be asked to leave as well.

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Fire Alarms and Building Evacuations

The careless use of fire, the removal of or tampering with fire-fighting equipment, and the setting off of “false” fire alarms endangers the lives and property of the Pitzer College community and is prohibited on its campus. (This violation of state law is classified as a misdemeanor and can result in a fine of up to $1000 and a possible jail term of up to one year). Judicial action will take place against an individual or group that violates this policy. Individuals refusing to evacuate a building during a fire alarm or other building evacuation can be cited by the Fire Marshall and are subject to judicial action. (Refer also to the section on fire safety regulations within the section on Residential Living).

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Firearms, Explosives and Weapons Policies

Possession, use, or transportation of firearms or “deadly weapons” is prohibited on the campuses of The Claremont Colleges. The storage or transportation of such weapons by students or staff on campus or in automobiles parked on or frequenting the campus is prohibited. Violation of this policy will result in confiscation of the weapon and may result in judicial action by the College. The term “deadly weapon” includes, but is not limited to, a blackjack, slingshot, billy club, sand club, metal knuckles, dagger, switch blade knife, pistol, bee-bee gun, revolver or other firearm, any knife with a blade longer than five inches, any razor with an unguarded blade, any metal pipe or bar, or other object used or intended to be used as a weapon.

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Housing Accommodations Policy and Procedures

Pitzer Academic Support Services (PASS) is committed to meeting the needs of its students and striving for inclusion and access to all Pitzer classes, programs, and activities. This is done through determining reasonable accommodations or by redesigning aspects of the campus experience, including housing.

If you would like to establish accommodations or determine your eligibility, please submit a request before the semester begins, specific dates will be provided before the room draw process.  . Please note that term “accommodations” is used throughout this website to include not only disability-related accommodations, but also disability-related services and/or auxiliary aids.

Requesting Housing Accommodations

Reasonable accommodations are determined following an individualized assessment of each request. Among the factors considered in determining reasonable accommodations for students are:

  • The nature of the student’s disability
  • Accommodations that have been accessed by that student in the past
  • Whether the requested accommodations will allow the student to effectively access and participate in residence life
  • Whether the requested accommodations will alter the essential requirements of residence life, campus housing and the experience of living in community.

The process to request and establish housing accommodations are as follows:

Step 1: Initiate a Request and Submit Documentation

Please submit the appropriate housing accommodation request and submit documentation. Supporting documentation should include:

  1. A specific diagnosis
  2. A description of how the diagnosis was reached, methods and procedures, test results and evaluation of test results; relevant medical, family, psychosocial and educational history
  3. Licensure and experience of a health care professional
  4. What and how any major life activities are limited by the impairment
  5. How the disability causes any housing/campus life difficulties
  6. A list of any and all accommodations, which might be needed to facilitate the student’s participation in residence life

Step 2: Follow Up on Accommodation Logistics

Follow up with PASS and housing if you have not heard back on the status of your application as deadlines draw near. If there are any concerns, questions, or difficulties that need to be addressed, please contact PASS academicsupportservices@pitzer.edu as soon as possible. We will quickly do our best to facilitate the accommodation process and offer support.

Step 3: Renew Your Housing Accommodations

Each academic year, students with housing accommodations will need to reapply with PASS to renew accommodations, if needed for the upcoming school year and will need to be done before the Room Draw Process. Please note that this process can vary and is reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

*Room Accommodation for Disabilities Application (RADA)

In compliance with applicable state and federal laws, some students with disabilities/access needs may receive consideration regarding their housing placement. Such considerations may include placement in specific residence halls or rooms. All accommodations are determined on a case-by-case basis and will only be considered for students with physical, medical, psychological, or sensory disabilities that are appropriately documented and determined to impact a major life activity.

Note: Documented and approved accommodation requests which include access to a single room will be charged the double room rate.

Service Animals

Pitzer College permits individually trained dogs that qualify as service animals on campus. A service animal is defined as: Any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The work or task that the dog performs must be directly related to the individual’s disability.

The following animals are not considered service animals under titles II and III of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA);

  • Any animal besides dogs (though there are special provisions permitting miniature horses in some cases);
  • Animals that serve solely to provide a crime deterrent effect, and
  • Emotional support, comfort, or companion animals.

The regulations also provide that Pitzer College need not accommodate a service animal if it poses a direct threat to the health and safety of others, the owner cannot effectively control it, or if the animal is not housebroken.

Emotional Support Animals (ESAs)

In accordance with the Fair Housing Act, an individual with a documented disability may have the right to have an animal in campus housing if the animal qualifies as a ‘reasonable accommodation’ that is necessary to afford the student equal opportunity to use and enjoy the housing; (assuming that the use of the animal does not pose a direct threat). Approval from PASS is required before the animal is allowed on campus.

Upon submitting a request and documentation, staff will review the information provided and will contact the student to communicate decision. If approved, student will be asked to sign an ESA Agreement outlining guidelines and student responsibilities as well as potential causes for removal of the ESA from campus housing. Any non-approved ESAs will be considered pets and therefore asked to be removed and may be subject to fines per ResLife Housing Policies.

Additional Resources

Student Disability Resource Center

Department of Education Office of Civil Rights

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Institutional Review Board

Pitzer College maintains an Institutional Review Board (IRB) in order to ensure (1) that researchers who are part of the College community protect the dignity, privacy, and safety of the participants they recruit for their research, and (2) that the dignity, privacy, and safety of members of the Pitzer community are protected when they choose to participate in research. Pitzer’s IRB deals only with research involving human participants; research involving nonhuman subjects must be reviewed elsewhere at The Claremont Colleges.

College policy requires that all research involving human participants and all information-gathering regarding individual human beings carried out by the students and faculty of Pitzer or taking place on campus should follow the principles set forward The Belmont Report and that all such research and information-gathering must be submitted for IRB review, with the exception of procedures carried out by students under the direction of their instructors and involving, in the view of the instructor, neither

greater than minimal risk, conflicts of interest regarding his or her own research, nor participants who may be unable to give informed consent.

Research Involving Human Subjects -Research is defined by federal law as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. A ‘systematic investigation’ is any methodical collection of data. This includes interviews, surveys, tests, observations, or other experiments, regardless of content, even if it is a pilot study.”

A research project is considered to have human subjects if it involves “a living individual about whom an investigator obtains data through intervention or interaction with the individual or identifiable private information.”

The only exceptions are procedures carried out by students under the direction of their instructors and, in the view of the instructor, does not pose greater than minimal risk to the human participants, does not create conflicts of interest regarding the instructor’s own research, or does not involve human participants who may not be unable to give informed consent.

Application Procedure-All projects that involve data collection at Pitzer College must be approved by the Pitzer College IRB regardless of whether the principal investigator (i.e. the primary faculty, staff, or student conducting the research) is affiliated with Pitzer College or some other institution. Principal investigators affiliated with Pitzer College who wish to collect data at other institutions must gain IRB approval at Pitzer College and at those institutions.

Principal investigators and all members of their research teams must complete the Protecting Human Research Participants (PHRP) course offered online through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Upon completion of this course, a certificate is generated by the online training program. Copies of these certificates for the principal investigator and all team members must accompany the application for IRB review.

For application forms, instructions and more information, visit www.pitzer.edu/irb. Please allow a minimum of two weeks for your application to be processed and reviewed. Only complete applications will be reviewed.

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Leave of Absence and College Withdrawal

Students may sometimes find it necessary to interrupt their college education. When a financial, medical or other situation makes it impossible or unwise for students to continue enrollment, they may apply to the Registrar’s Office for a leave of absence or withdrawal from the college.

A leave of absence permits students to return to Pitzer without applying for readmission to the College. Leaves will normally be approved for no more than two semesters. If students decide not to return to the College after a leave of two semesters, they will automatically be withdrawn from the College and must reapply for admission to return thereafter. Students may request an extension of a leave for one additional semester in case of extenuating circumstances. Students will be placed on a leave of absence for failure to register for classes by the tenth day of the semester.Students returning from a leave of absence are eligible to participate in pre-registration and room draw for the following semester.

When a leave of absence is taken after the final day to drop courses, a grade of W (Withdrew) will be recorded for each registered course in that semester. Leave of Absence forms must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar as soon as possible and no later than the last day of classes for the semester (prior to final exam week).

Students returning from a leave of absence are eligible to participate in pre-registration and room draw for the following semester.

For information on refunds in case of leaves or withdrawals, please refer to the section on “Refund Policies” in the Pitzer College Catalog.

Involuntary Leave of Absence: When there are indications that a student’s behavior could result in psychological or physical harm to her/himself or to others, prompt and decisive action is in the best interest of everyone. The Vice President for Student Affairs and/or the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs may place a student on involuntary leave of absence for a specified period or until such time the danger may be shown to no longer exist. Any student arrested for a felony or a misdemeanor involving crimes of violence, dishonesty, or moral turpitude may be immediately placed on involuntary leave. The College shall retain discretion to determine when it would be appropriate for the student to return to study.

Medical Leave of Absence: The purpose of a medical leave of absence (MLOA) is to provide a student time away from campus for the treatment of a physical or mental health condition that impairs a student’s ability to be successful academically and/or to participate as a member of the Pitzer community.  The authority to grant a MLOA and permission to return from a MLOA resides within the Division of Student Affairs which will work in collaboration with the Registrar’s Office, Students Accounts, Financial Aid and the Dean of Faculty to streamline the process once approved.

Each leave will be individualized based on the needs of the student and handled on a case-by-case basis. Students who request and obtain a voluntary MLOA during an academic semester may be eligible for assistance navigating the following:

  • Tuition adjustments or refunds
  • Impact on financial aid award
  • Opportunity to petition for late course withdrawal if needed
  • A coordinated treatment plan in collaboration with Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services or Student Health Services as needed

While on a MLOA, a student may register for classes for the following semester only after being approved to return by the Office of Student Affairs. Students on medical leave are strongly encouraged to consult with their academic advisor several weeks in advance and have an academic plan in place in order to be prepared for class registration. All students need registration clearance from their advisor in order to register.

Leaves will normally be approved for no more than two semesters. Students who do not return after a leave of two semesters will automatically be withdrawn from the college and must reapply for admission to return thereafter. A petition for a third semester based on medical needs may be submitted to the Academic Standards Committee in collaboration with Pitzer Academic Support Services for a third semester in severe cases. In severe medical cases, a petition for a third semester may be submitted to the Academic Standards Committee in collaboration with Pitzer Academic Support Services.

For more information please contact the Office of the Registrar at 909-607-2650.

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Law Enforcement Policies

Civil Law Enforcement on Campus Policy

Community law enforcement officers have the right and responsibility to react to law violations on the campuses of colleges and universities in the same way and under the same constraints as in other parts of the community. By tradition and present mutual understanding, the Department of Campus Safety will usually be informed first of possible violations of law. They will deal with the immediate situation and, if advisable, notify the appropriate law enforcement officers and cooperate with them to investigate the possible offense.

Protocol for Contacting Local Law Enforcement for Assistance

  1. When a disruptive situation on a campus or campuses reaches a stage where a police presence is deemed necessary to restore normal college operations, the President, President’s designee or the CEO of TCC or the CEO’s designee may seek police intervention.

  2. When police intervention is required and arrests ensue, the police assume that the Colleges or TCC will bring trespass or other legally appropriate charges against those arrested.

  3. In a non-peaceful situation that poses a threat to public safety, the police role is altered. Actions that endanger or threaten to endanger persons or property may result in police intervention, arrests and charges even if not initiated by College officials. Non-peaceful situations may be policed and prosecuted without College involvement.

  4. When police are called to manage or to intervene in a disruptive or non-peaceful incident, the situation becomes a police matter. The police will determine appropriate action -what steps it is necessary to take and what level of force should be used.

Approved by the Council of The Claremont Colleges, August 28, 2001. This policy is not to be amended or changed without approval of the Council.

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Medical Insurance

All students are required to have medical insurance for the entire school year. All students are required to update their medical insurance information every year via the portal online. If no proof of medical insurance is provided by the stated deadlines you will be automatically enrolled in and billed for the Claremont College’s Student Health Insurance Plan.  Once the student is enrolled, the fee is nonrefundable.  It is the student’s responsibility to notify the Office of Student Affairs of any change in insurance.

For more information regarding the Student Health Insurance Plan, please visit www.pitzer.edu/student-accounts/health-insurance/ or call the Office of Student Affairs; 909-607-2821.

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Missing Student Notification Policy

Students who reside in on-campus housing are encouraged to identify a person to be contacted if it is determined that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours, and to register that person’s emergency contact information, on the online portal each year If a student is determined to have been missing for 24 hours, the College and/ or Department of Campus Safety will, within 24 hours, notify the appropriate law enforcement agency, and, if the missing student is under 18 years of age, and not an emancipated individual, the College and/or Department will also notify a custodial parent or guardian.

If a member of the College community believes that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, it should be reported to the On-Call Dean, and/or the Department of Campus Safety so that appropriate action can be taken.

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Notifications

The Office of Student Affairs considers communication through the student Pitzer email account and/or the assigned student campus mailbox to be the official and formal way of contacting students.

If you feel as though you are not receiving communication emails from the Office of Student Affairs, please contact the Office of Information Technology at 909-607-3065.

Emergency Notifications

Everbridge is an emergency notification service available to students, faculty, and staff. Everbridge can be used to send emergency messages within minutes of the occurrence of an incident. Pitzer College performs a College-wide annual test of the Everbridge system.

Pitzer College is committed to ensuring the campus community receives timely, accurate, and useful information in the event of a significant emergency or dangerous situation on campus or in the local area that poses an immediate threat to the health and safety of campus community members.

For more information, please visit the Emergency Information & Preparedness page.

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Public Art, Posting Publicity and Soliciting

Public Art Policy

The Public Art Policy, formerly known as the “Outdoor” Art Policy is overseen by the Campus Aesthetics Committee. To propose any new public artwork or to remove any existing public artwork from the residence halls or any other Pitzer College campus location, as described in sections 1 and 2, you must first contact the Campus Aesthetics Committee. Please see the public art guidelines and policies published by the Campus Aesthetics Committee on Pitzer’s website.

  1. Residence Hall Policy
    Applies to all public or semi-public spaces inside the residence halls and exterior walls of the residence halls.

  2. Non-Residence Hall Policy 
    Applies to locations not covered by section 1 - that is, the interior and exterior walls of all campus buildings, structures and areas except for inside or on a residence hall.

The following provisions apply to sections 1 and 2 (above):

  1. All proposals for public artwork on campus must be submitted to the Campus Aesthetics Committee for approval.

  2. All public artwork that has been approved by the Campus Aesthetics Committee will remain unless questioned by the community in accordance with the grievance policy.

  3. All proposals for public artwork located inside or on a residence hall must be submitted to the Campus Aesthetics Committee. If the artwork is approved by the Campus Aesthetics Committee, it then must be submitted to the Hall Council of the residence hall for which the artwork is being proposed to be installed or displayed for final approval.

 

  1. Public Art Grievance Policy

The Campus Aesthetics Committee values community input regarding artwork on campus. As such, the following criteria are in place so that the voice of the community can be heard and allow for an open dialogue.

  • Where there is a grievance voiced about any public artwork on campus the grievance will be referred to the Campus Aesthetics Committee.

At this point, the Campus Aesthetics Committee will try to contact the artist(s) and address the grievance of their artwork.

The Campus Aesthetics Committee will try work with the artist to see if they can conceptualize and design modifications or select an alternative site for their artwork.

  • If the artist cannot be contacted, the Campus Aesthetics Committee will make recommendations for the artwork, including removing or painting over the artwork entirely, or if there is still dissent with an artwork or the artist and Campus Aesthetics Committee cannot come to a consensus the grievance should be brought to the attention of the community.

In such a case, the grievance at hand, and the time of a meeting must be effectively published more than a week before any voting takes place. Effective publishing may be done through but is not limited to mails, flyers, table tents and/or campus mail. If quorum, as described in the Faculty Handbook, is present at this meeting the issue will then be voted on by the Committee.

  1. Financial responsibility for all original artwork is the duty of the artist as well as any costs incurred during any modifications or removal of artwork (should it be deemed necessary by the Campus Aesthetics Committee). Artists must, therefore, be prepared to pay for this process or to apply for funding for their artwork.

Posting Publicity Guidelines

If any of these guidelines and procedures are not observed, staff members have been instructed to remove flyers, posters and banners immediately.

Publicity Guidelines

  • Flyers, posters and banners are to be approved prior to posting on campus.
  • Students receive approval from OSA for their publicity. Staff and Faculty may seek approval through their own departments.
  • Banners or other kinds of large-scale advertising must be approved and then cleared for placement prior to posting on campus.
  • Chalking of campus walkways, etc. is not permitted unless approved by the Office of Student Affairs.  Chalking on vertical surfaces, buildings, or covered walkways is never permitted.
  • All flyers, posters and banners for an event need to have the following information: name(s) of the sponsoring organizations/ people, title of the event, date/time/location of the event, and contact information of event host.
  • Recommended number of flyers or posters for the campus is no more than twenty-five (25) for events and meetings open to Pitzer staff and students. No more than three (3) banners are recommended.
  • Posting for reasons other than event or meeting publicity (e.g. housing available, services or goods available from Claremont Colleges’ people, etc.) are subject to the above: recommended number of flyers or posters is five (5) or one (1) banner.
  • Commercial offers and other solicitation from non-Claremont Colleges’ sources are explicitly prohibited unless approved by the Office of Student Affairs.
  • The Pitzer Mail Room, as a matter of policy, will not stuff all student boxes.
  • Flyers, posters and banners must be removed by the sponsoring organization or people who posted them immediately after the event and please recycle!

Posting Guidelines

  • Post on public bulletin boards, with a maximum of one per board. Do not post over others and post only on open, non-designated/ labeled bulletin boards.
  • Do not post on glass doors or painted surfaces, such as residence hall doors, classroom doors and the pillars along the mounds.
  • Please respect our campus art and refrain from posting on or over any piece of artwork.
  • Use staples or thumbtacks for posting on bulletin boards. All postings not on bulletin boards must be hung with blue painters’ tape.
  • Do not use electrical tape, duct tape or scotch tape for posting.
  • Any organization/people consistently abusing these guidelines and procedures will no longer be permitted to publicize at Pitzer College.
  • The Office of Student Affairs reserves the right to limit or stop distribution of publicity deemed offensive.

Publicity

There are many ways to publicize your event besides the usual posting of flyers, posters or a banner. You can use word of mouth, table tents, message boards, social networking media, etc. Be creative, but please observe the posting publicity guidelines and procedures at Pitzer and the other colleges, which were developed to provide effective publicity, while using a minimum of natural resources. If you have any questions when creating your publicity, feel free to contact any member of the Student Affairs staff for assistance.

Soliciting

The College does not allow soliciting, promoting, or selling any product or service by anyone from outside the College unless they have written permission from the Office of Student Affairs

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Residence Life & Dining Policies and Procedures

Residence Life Policies and Procedures

Students who choose not to adhere to the following policies may face judicial action. Please direct any questions to the Residence Life office at housing@pitzer.edu.

Adhesives 

The use of duct tape is strictly prohibited. Masking tape or blue painters tape is recommended for putting up posters in residence rooms. In Pitzer, Atherton and Sanborn Halls (PAS Halls), and West, East, and Skandera Halls (WES Halls), it is recommended that students use push pins or thumb tacks. In Mead Hall, students are recommended to use adhesives such as painters tape and 3M hooks. The use of nails or screws is also prohibited.

Alcohol and Drinking Games 

The following are some of the regulations regarding alcoholic beverages. For the complete guidelines regarding the alcohol and drug policies please see the General College Policies section of the Handbook.

  1. Alcohol possession in residence halls is permitted only for students of legal age (21). Alcohol may be consumed only by legal- age students in students’ rooms, or with the exception of special events, registered with the Dean of Students or their designee. Consumption of alcohol should not infringe on the rights of other students.

  2. Students of legal age may not give or sell alcohol to students under the legal age to transport, possess or consume. Students may not advertise for the sale of alcohol using flyers, emails, or other methods of advertising.

  3. Students under the legal age may not transport, possess, consume or purchase alcohol in any area of the residence halls.

  4. Students under the legal age may not possess any empty alcoholic beverage containers in their residence hall rooms. The only exception is when a roommate is of legal age and owns the container.

  5. Empty alcohol containers should not be displayed in areas visible to the public and are subject to disposal if observed.

  6. Students may not possess or transport open containers of alcoholic beverages in public areas.

  7. Students may not consume alcoholic beverages in public areas including, but not limited to: administrative and academic buildings, residence hall common areas including lobbies, study rooms, living rooms, special purpose rooms, corridors, basements, stairwells, laundry and vending machine areas; and outdoor areas including sun decks, courtyards, parking lots, etc.

  8. Large quantities of alcohol are prohibited at unregistered events, in private rooms and in residence halls (e.g. kegs, pony kegs, beer balls, etc.). Such quantities of alcohol and serving devices will be confiscated and will not be returned.

  9. In support of New Student Orientation and leadership positions, Substance Free Early Arrivals is in effect upon the first day students return to campus as Early Arrivals until 9 a.m. on the first day of classes for Fall and Spring Semesters. Substance Free means no alcohol or other substances may be consumed or served on campus during this time. Students who violate the Substance Free Early Arrivals policy will be subject to stricter Student Conduct sanctioning and their early arrival privileges will be revoked for the future.

  10. Games that are centered on alcohol, focus on rapid consumption drinking, or promote irresponsible drinking are prohibited. Any devices or paraphernalia that aid in these games may be confiscated and will not be returned. These devices include but are not limited to beer pong tables and beer bongs or funnels.

Alterations

No student may install equipment or make repairs to a residence hall room or common area without prior permission from their RD or Facilities. Smoke detector dismantling, room vent alterations, tampering with heating and cooling controls, painting, and screen tampering are strictly prohibited. Exterior installation of antennas, hammocks, or satellite dishes for personal use is not permitted.

Appliances 

Safety standards prohibit the use of cooking appliances which use heating elements in student rooms. Electrical appliances such as toasters, toaster ovens, hot plates, space heaters and refrigerators larger than 4.4 cubic feet are prohibited in our main campus residence halls. Refrigerators must have adequate ventilation on all sides. Microwave ovens larger than 1.0 cubic feet are prohibited. The electrical circuits are not designed to carry heavy loads so the use of surge protector strips is recommended.

Balconies

The following are policies regarding suite balconies in Mead and at CCA.

  1. No drinking alcohol on suite balconies.

  2. No throwing trash or objects from balconies or windows.

  3. No hanging items from the balconies or catwalks (without written permission from the Facilities Office).

  4. No open flames are permitted on balconies.

  5. Including but not limited to: all types of grills (propane, charcoal, wood or other), chimineas, tiki torches, and open flame lanterns.

  6. No college-owned furniture is allowed outside on suite balconies.

  7. No smoking on suite balconies. All residence halls are completely non-smoking.

  8. Residents may not paint murals on balconies without going to the Aesthetics Committee and then the Residence Hall Council for approval. 

  9. Residents may not use chalk, or any other temporary paint or substance, to mark or decorate the exterior hallways, walkways, or balconies.

Bicycles

Students are encouraged to have a bicycle on campus. Bicycles, whenWhen not in use, bicycles should be securely locked to bicycle racks. It is prohibited for you to chain bicycles to trees, poles, fences, handrails, benches, stairwells and fire hose connections due to fire/life safety hazards, especially for emergency evacuation. Bikes will be removed from these locations and impounded without notice. To retrieve an impounded bike, you must provide ID and a detailed description of the bike to the Facilities DepartmentGreen Bike Program. A $50 fee will be required to release the bike to the owner. If unclaimed after two weeks of impound, bikes will be donated to charity.the Green Bike Program (GBP). 

During Winter Break, the campus is closed and all bicycles need to be removed from the bicycle racks and stored in your personal room. Bicycles may not be stored inside common areas of buildings.

During Summer Break, all bikes need to be removed by the Monday following graduation.  Bike racks will be cleaned out during the first week of summer and all bikes left on the racks will be cut off and given to the Green Bike Program (GBP).

Building Evacuations, Fire Alarms, and Smoke Detectors  

One approved fire drill per semester will be conducted in each residence hall. The ResLife staff will discuss the evacuation plan and meeting locations during hall/floor meetings. The participation of everyone is required. Individuals refusing to evacuate a building during a fire alarm or other building evacuation will be cited by the Fire Marshall and/or College officials and are subject to judicial action. The removal of, or tampering with firefighting equipment is a violation of state law, and the setting off of “false” fire alarms endangers the lives and property of the Pitzer College community and is prohibited. This includes tampering with your smoke detector (removing batteries, etc.) or fire extinguisher. This violation of state law can result in a fine of up to $1000 and a possible jail term of up to one year. Judicial action will take place against an individual or group that violates this policy.

Please see Fire Alarms and Building Evacuations for policy applicable to the entire Pitzer College campus.

Cable Television 

Pitzer College does not have cable in residence halls rooms, but each residence hall living room (E. Sanborn Living Room, West Hall Living Room and Mead Living Room) has cable TV. Students are welcome to contract with Spectrum Cable individually if they would like cable TV in their rooms. Students should contact Spectrum to set-up an appointment for Fridays. Then the student should contact Pitzer Facilities at 909-607-2226 to let them know their appointment time so a representative from Facilities can be present to let Spectrum into the proper electrical closets in the building. 

Claremont Collegiate Apartments (CCA) at Claremont Graduate University (CGU)

If you are living at the Claremont Collegiate Apartments this year, make sure to look at their Housing Services Student Guide as some policies and procedures may be different from main campus housing. If you have you have any specific questions you can contact  housing@pitzer.edu or go to the CCA Housing Services Office located in building B-103, “Manager’s Office.”

Cleaning 

Facilities employs custodians and maintenance personnel to keep the residence halls clean and in good order. As members of a responsible community, it is up to the residents to always clean up after themselves. Public areas regularly cleaned and maintained by staff include hallways, lobbies, hall living rooms, recreation rooms, community kitchens, and laundry rooms. If these common areas are neglected and left excessively dirty, access to the area may be suspended by the RD or Facilities. Students are responsible for keeping individual rooms, bathrooms, and suite living rooms clean. Limited cleaning supplies can be checked out from the Residence Life Office located in East Sanborn Hall C300, or the CCA Housing Office for CCA residents.

Clothing Policy 

All members of the Pitzer community, including guests, are required to wear clothing at all times when in public. Students also must be fully clothed, including footwear, in order to enter McConnell Dining Hall. Swimwear must be worn at the pool area.

Common Area Damage Charges 

Residents sharing rooms and common living areas are held financially responsible for cleaning and damage charges considered above and beyond normal wear and tear. Unless an individual or group of individuals take responsibility for damages in public areas, financial responsibility for damage to College property will be assigned to the smallest identifiable population within the residence hall. Common area damage charges will be assessed at the end of each semester.

Common Area Furniture

This includes furniture in study rooms, living rooms, WES Single Suites, Mead suites, CCA apartments, etc.  Common area furniture is not to be removed from public areas. If a piece of common area furniture is discovered in your room or apartment, you can be charged up to $150 with an additional $25 a day until the furniture is returned. Furniture in Mead suite living rooms is considered common area furniture. If a room and/or suite furniture is missing or damaged, the room and/or suite will be billed collectively unless an individual or group of individuals takes responsibility. Please note that College-owned furniture is not allowed out on exterior hallways, or suite balconies.

Drones

Federal Aviation Administration clearance is required to fly a drone on Pitzer property because of the college’s proximity to Cable airport. Fines for violating FAA regulations can be very costly.

Users can register at www.faa.gov/uas/registration/

FAA seeks to educate operators about the rules: drones must be operated only below 400 feet, within sight of the operator at all times; they must stay away from manned aircraft, never fly over crowds or events, and if flying within 5 miles of an airport, the operator must contact the airport first. Cable airport has requested that drones on college property operate no higher than 200 feet with the exception of Pitzer College.  Pitzer College falls into a safety zone that the airport manager requests no drone activity unless the operator has filed for and received proper FAA clearance.

Emergency Medical Assistance 

In the event of an accident or severe illness, immediately, contact Campus Safety (909-607-2000) and explain the nature of the problem. In the case of an illness not requiring immediate emergency care, Student Health Services can be contacted at 909-621-8222. College staff (including RAs and Residence Life staff) are not permitted to transport students for medical care. For information on accommodations due to illness or other medical issue, visit the Pitzer Academic Support Services website.

Emergency Maintenance Assistance

If an emergency maintenance situation (such as a flood, electrical problem, or broken window) occurs during business hours (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) please contact Facilities at 909-607-2226 immediately. If it is past normal working hours and you are not able to locate an RA, call Campus Safety at 909-607-2000 and tell them you have a maintenance problem. Facilities/ Maintenance and custodial staff are authorized to enter student rooms for cleaning, maintenance, and/or repair without the student being present or prior notification.

Event Registration

All large-scale social events must be registered through Campus Life.  No large-scale social events can be registered in, or near, the residence halls. For more information, please see the Event Registration & Hosting Guidelines.

Fines and Charges

  1. Rationale for Damage Policies 
    It is the policy of the College to charge individuals responsible for damages that occur or items that are lost from the residence halls. Charges reflect the cost of replacement and/ or repairs. Furthermore, it is the policy of the College to attempt to establish financial responsibility for damages that occur in public areas of a residence hall for which individual responsibility cannot be ascertained. Costs for acts of unclaimed vandalism may be charged back to those residing within the smallest identifiable space where the vandalism occurred.

  2. Damages and Losses within Individual Student Rooms
    All losses and damages which occur within an individual student’s room beyond the range of fair wear and tear are charged to the resident(s) of the room. The Room Completion Report (RCR) completed at the beginning of each resident’s occupancy protects the student from being held liable for previous damage. Individual student rooms are inspected upon checkout. Bathrooms are inspected for damages, violations and cleanliness during the winter break and again at the end of the year. Bathrooms and rooms should be cleaned so that they are “move-in ready” when students depart at the end of their time in housing.

    At the end of the academic year, charges are assessed for damage and loss through year-end inspection and checkout procedures. Charges are billed to individual student accounts. For students not returning the following year (graduating or withdrawing), such charges are deducted from their deposit and if the charges exceed the amount of the deposit, the difference is billed to the student’s account.

  3. Housekeeping in Common Areas 
    All students are expected to keep the common areas of the residence halls, including the laundry rooms, kitchens, and study rooms, in a reasonable state of cleanliness. When an excessive mess is found, it is the responsibility of the residents of the residence hall to clean it up. In the case of a common area, the smallest identifiable group of residents has the responsibility of restoring the area to reasonable cleanliness.

    During the semester, the RD of the affected building will contact residents with next steps. If the conditions are not up to standards by the end of the time period set by the RD, a fine will be assessed to each person responsible for the clean-up task. If no people are identified, the cleanup costs may be charged to those residing in the smallest identifiable space where the mess occurred. It should be noted that in some cases this means that students not directly responsible for the mess will be held responsible for the cleanup.

Fire Safety Regulations

Any items mentioned in the Student Handbook which are prohibited may be confiscated and will not be returned if discovered by ResLife Staff.

  1. Corridors, stairways, and exit doors are to be kept clear of obstructions at all times.

  2. Electrical appliances such as toasters, hot plates, saunas, space heaters, microwaves larger than 1.0 cubic feet and refrigerators larger than 4.4 cubic feet are prohibited. Refrigerators should be energy star rated and must have adequate ventilation on all sides.

  3. Multiple plug extension cords constitute a severe fire hazard and the danger of electrical shock. These items are prohibited in residence hall rooms when they are utilized for more than one appliance. Only the use of UL listed plug strips containing built-in fuses are permitted.

  4. All candles, incense, halogen lamps, fireworks, smudging and oil-fueled lamps are prohibited. These items are prohibited even if they are intended for decoration, recreation or ceremonial use.

  5. No flammable liquids are to be used or stored in the residence halls at any time.

  6. Excessive amounts of combustibles such as paper products or textiles stacked in rooms, attached to and/or covering walls and ceilings, covering lights or used as room dividers are prohibited.

  7. Nothing can be attached to or hung on the ceilings; this includes but is not limited to posters and tapestries.

  8. Corridor decorations shall be made from non-flammable materials or treated with appropriate flame-retardant solutions. All trees, tree branches, and tree limbs must be treated with an approved flame retardant solution and have tags affixed certifying that they have been flame proofed.

  9. The following are strictly prohibited: pipes, hookahs, water pipes, fireworks, and any glass or homemade smoking devices. If any of these items are found, they may be confiscated and will not be returned.

  10. Under NO circumstances will fires be allowed on campus (this includes all activities related to fire such as, but not limited to, fire dancers, tiki torches, etc.). due to the highly flammable vegetation in the area.

Furniture

Students may not remove any college issued furniture from their rooms in any residence halls including CCA. This includes, but is not limited to bed frames and mattresses, coffee tables, desks, and couches Bed lofting or bunking parts may only be removed or requested by filling out a work order through Facilities at www.pitzer.edu/facilities/work-requests/. Do not leave dismantled bed lofting or bunking parts out in the hallway or walkways.  If your furniture is left in the hallway for more than 24 hours then it is subject to confiscation and any missing furniture will be charged to the residents.  If students dismantle their bed during the academic year, they must re-assemble the bed prior to departing the residence halls or they will be fined.  Water containing furniture is not allowed in the residence halls. This includes hot tubs, pools, water beds, saunas, etc.

Guests

Students are welcome to invite off-campus friends or family to visit and stay overnight on main campus and at CCA. The following guest policies are intended to protect the quality of life for all within our residential communities.

  1. Students who wish to host a guest must have the approval of their roommate/s and suitemates. The right of a student to live in reasonable privacy supersedes the right of a student to host a guest.

  2. Guests are required to carry a valid form of ID at all times.

  3. Any student found in violation of the guest policy could result in the student losing their right to host future guests. Any guest found in repeated violation of the guest policy may be banned from the residence halls.

  4. A guest may stay up to 96 hours (4 days) within a two-week interval. A longer stay may be discussed with the RD.

  5. There is a limit to 3 guests at any one time, per room in the residence halls.

  6. Guests are not allowed to sleep in any common areas.

  7. Student hosts are responsible for informing their guests of all College policies and their guests are responsible for abiding by the policies, as well as all state and federal laws. Guest status can be revoked if at any time the guest violates College policies or state or federal laws. Guest status may also be revoked if the guest is behaving in a manner that disrupts the community as determined by a College official. 

  8. Student hosts will be held accountable for the conduct of their guests and for any violations incurred by them

  9. Guests who are minors require written permission from a parent or guardian to be on campus.

  10. No guest under the age of 21 is to ask for, accept, or consume any alcoholic beverage while on the property of The Claremont Colleges.

  11. Many events hosted on the other Claremont College campuses require guests of students to show a guest pass. Please see the specific policies for each campus (Event Resources: 5C Guest Pass Policies for Event Attendance.)

  12. Students cannot rent or sublet their residence hall rooms.

Hallway Couches & Furniture 

In Pitzer, Atherton and Sanborn Halls (PAS Halls), and West, East, and Skandera Halls (WES Halls) students may place couches, benches, chairs and stools between their door and their neighbor’s. Items placed between doors shall not protrude into the walking path or block any doors from opening and closing properly. No college-owned furniture is allowed outside in the hallways. Excessively dirty or damaged items are not permitted; as determined by Facilities or the RD. All items must be removed from the corridors when halls close at the end of spring semester. If items are not removed, the residents whose rooms are closest to the item will accrue the removal costs.

In Mead and at CCA, furniture cannot be placed in any of the public areas outside the building (for example, against the building, near windows, in the courtyard, etc.

Hammocks 

All exterior hammocks must be approved by Facilities before being installed. Please contact Facilities at 909.607.2226 to obtain structural and safety approval. Hammocks that do not meet the requirements will be removed immediately without notice.

Health and Safety Inspections 

In order to maintain a healthy, safe environment in our residential communities, periodic health and safety checks of common areas and student rooms are conducted by Facilities and the ResLife staff. These room checks are for preventive and corrective actions. Notice of these checks will be posted 24 hours in advance. If your room does not meet suitable standards, you will be given 24 hours to correct the problem. If in the course of conducting the check any prohibited items are found, they may be confiscated and will not be returned. Students will be referred for Student Conduct follow-up. Staff are authorized to enter student rooms for these checks.

Heating and Air Conditioning

All residence halls have central heating and air conditioning. Tampering with heating and cooling controls is strictly prohibited.

The WES & PAS HVAC systems have a preset temperature range (between 68-72º) and the system will automatically provide air conditioning or heating based on that setting range. Please do not attempt to access the thermostat by tampering with the cover guard. Damage to the cover guard will be considered a violation of the Code of Conduct and billed to the student. Each room has a sensor in the main window which shuts off the HVAC system when the window is open.

The Mead HVAC system has a preset temperature range and the system will automatically provide air conditioning or heating based on that setting range. The system sensors take some time to automatically adjust the indoor temperature when outdoor temperature changes. Always keep the “Heat/AC” switch in the “ON” position, except during break periods.

If the air conditioning or heating is not working, fill out an online work order form and notify your Residence Director. The Facilities Department receives work orders during business hours. If your request is outside of these times and requires immediate attention, contact Campus Safety. The Student Handbook prohibits the use of portable air conditioners and heaters which, in addition to being a safety hazard, will prevent the room air conditioning and heating system from working properly.

Housing Wait List & Deferred Housing List 

Students not able to obtain a room at the time of room draw can place their name on the single (if eligible) or double room wait list. The wait list policy is as follows:

  • To be eligible for a room, you must not have any unpaid balance with the College.
  • You will have up to a week after room draw to place yourself on the waitlist which will be organized by priority number.
  • Students requesting to be placed on the waitlist after the set deadline will be placed by date of request after those on the initial room draw wait list.
  • The wait list is divided by priority number and is updated every year after room draw. It is used during the summer to place people in rooms as vacancies occur. If your status changes during the year, it is your responsibility to notify the Residence Life Office.
  • Your name will be dropped off the waitlist if you withdraw, graduate or take a leave of absence from the College.
  • As rooms become available, your name will move up the waitlist. The Residence Life Office will contact the next person from the wait list if a room becomes available.
  • Should you decline a housing offer, your name will be moved to the bottom of the list.

ID Cards 

Installed in all of the residence halls, the ID card access system allows Pitzer students access to each residence hall door equipped with an ID card reader. As a resident of PAS Halls and WESHalls, your ID card is the key to gain access into your room. Do not lend your key to anyone else.  In the event of theft or loss, please obtain new ID cards at The Claremont Colleges (TCCS) Connection, 800 N. Dartmouth Ave., Claremont, CA. 91711 or 909.607.2273 (7CARD). The TCCS Connection is located at the south entrance of the Honnold-Mudd Library. There is no cost for a damaged ID card if you bring the damaged ID card to the TCCS Connection and the cost for a new card is currently $15. Residents living in PAS or WES Halls will need to have their new ID card coded by the Residence Life Office in order to have access to their room.  The Residence Life Office is located in East Sanborn, C300

Keys:

For your own personal safety and the safety of your personal belongings, you are urged to lock your room at all times. Do not lend your key to anyone else.  If you lose your key, it is important that you notify your Residence Director immediately to initiate a lock/core change. Charges for lock changes will be placed on your student account. General charges are listed below:

Monday - Friday, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Re-key/core room only - $150

Re-key/core room and suite - $300
 

Monday - Friday, 4:30 p.m.-8 a.m.

All Day Saturday and Sunday

Re-key/core room only - $200

Re-key/core room & suite - $400

Laundry 

Each residence hall is equipped with coin and/or card operated laundry machines. In main campus residence halls, Claremont Cash or quarters must be used (see Claremont Card Center for additional instructions about how to add Claremont Cash to your ID card).  At CCA, only quarters are accepted. You must provide your own laundry detergent and supplies.

Lockouts 

All residents should lock their doors before leaving their rooms and carry their room key or key card with them, Not only is this a good safety and security practice, it also prevents you from locking yourself out of your room. While everyone locks themselves out of a room or suite occasionally, -residents are expected to take the responsibility to have their key/key card with them, and requests for lockouts should occur infrequently. If you should lock yourself out of your room, please utilize the guidelines below:

Main Campus

Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to the start of quiet hours (Sunday - Thursday.11 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 1 a.m.), go to the Residence Life Office, East Sanborn, C300

During quiet hours to 9 a.m., call Campus Safety at 909.607.2000, to unlock your door (see below).

CCA

Contact the CCA Office during business hours or contact the Community Assistant On-Call at (909) 607-8506

All lockouts will be recorded. Each resident is allowed 2 free lockouts combined from any OSA staff member, or RA/CA over the course of the academic year. Additional lockouts performed by the Residence Life Office or RA/CA will be recorded and the resident may be fined $10. Staff members and RAs/CA are not permitted to unlock a door for anyone other than the resident of the room. Therefore, a resident must show proof of identification (i.e. student identification card, driver’s license) prior to entry. If the resident has no form of identification at the time, they will be required to show identification immediately upon entrance to the room. Multiple lockouts may result in the resident meeting with their RD.

If you should lock yourself out of your room between quiet hours and 9 a.m. you must call Campus Safety at 909.607.2000. This service currently costs $25 and you must show proper identification and a means to pay the fee (i.e. provide your account number for billing to your student account or pay by check). No cash will be accepted.

Lofts and Bunk Beds 

All loft-style beds not provided by the College must be cleared with Facilities for safety and stability. Lofted or bunked beds must leave at least three feet of space around the beds to allow for the maintenance crew to work without a safety hazard. If this much space is not allowed, the beds will not be lofted or bunked. Requests not submitted during the first month of each semester will not be considered. All requests will be considered based on priority, and parts available. Bed lofting or bunking parts may only be removed or requested by filling out a work order through Facilities at www.pitzer.edu/facilities. Do not leave dismantled bed lofting or bunking parts out in the hallway or walkways.

Medical Insurance 

Medical insurance is mandatory for all students. All students must have medical insurance/emergency information on file with the Office of Student Affairs. All students are required to update this information every year via the portal online. If no proof of medical insurance is provided by the stated deadlines you will be automatically enrolled in and billed for the Claremont College’s Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP).

Students can obtain a 100 percent refund one week before or on the first day of class. After the first day of class, the medical coverage charge is non- refundable. It is the student’s responsibility to keep the College informed of changes in medical coverage and coverage must be confirmed every year.  If you have any questions regarding medical insurance, please contact the Office of Student Affairs at 909.607.2821 or visit www.pitzer.edu/student-accounts/health-insurance/

Musical Instruments & Sound Equipment 

Student rooms, suites, or common areas are not appropriate places to play most musical instruments or have loud sound equipment (i.e. electric guitars, drums, and/or subwoofers). Certain types of instruments, such as acoustic guitars, may be played at a low volume in the residence halls provided they do not cause a disturbance. If you would like to arrange a location for music practice, please contact the Music Coalition.

Noise 

The primary mission of Pitzer College is education and in pursuit of this goal, students have the right to quiet time in which to read, study or sleep. Thus, all residence halls have quiet hours from 11 p.m. to 9 a.m., Sunday through Thursday, and 1 a.m. to 9 a.m. on weekends. Extended quiet hours are in place during the week before finals and final exams. All other hours should be viewed as consideration hours, emphasizing mutual respect and courtesy. If you are being disturbed by noise at any time, you have the right to request a decrease in the level of noise. If the person or persons causing the noise do not cooperate, you may want to contact a residence hall staff member to assist you. If an individual severely disrupts the community through repeated or significant noise disturbances, that individual is subject to judicial action. As an academic community, quiet hours are instituted during the last week of classes as well as finals week. Please be aware of others’ need to concentrate, sleep and study.

  • During the last week of classes there are partial quiet hours which are 7 p.m. to 9 am.
  • During finals week there are 24-hour quiet hours until the residence halls close.
  • Failure to comply with partial quiet hours or 24-hour quiet hours can result in fines or other sanctions.

Off-Campus Status 

All first, second, third-year, and fourth-year students are required to live on campus and enter into a residency agreement each academic year. This agreement serves as a contract outlining the terms and conditions for occupancy of College housing and board plan participation.  First, second, third, and fourth-year students can request to live off campus for a given academic year by submitting a formal application to the Residence Life Office. All first-year students requesting to live off campus must meet with the Residence Life Office prior to approval. Off-campus applications are available in the Office of Student Affairs. More information on the off-campus approval process can be found on the Room Draw website.

On-Call System 

Residence Life has an on-call system, in which there is always a Dean/Director on-call for Pitzer, an RD/Assistant Director on-call for the entire campus and RAs/CAs on-call each night until one hour after quiet hours begin.  The on-call staff member can be reached by cell phone. The cell phone numbers are listed on multiple posters in every residence hall and on every RA’s door. Please note: The RA on your floor is not always the RA on-call.  CCA residents can contact the CCA office or Community Assistant on call at 909-607-8506.

Painting of Common Areas and Rooms 

The personalization of common areas and hallways must meet guidelines of the individual hall policies, please go to your Hall Council for further information. The painting of student rooms, including bathrooms, is not allowed. Please see the Public Art Guidelines on the Campus Aesthetics Committee website for further information about art installations on campus.

Personal Property 

Pitzer College does not insure against loss, theft, or damage of any personal belongings, including water damage. We strongly urge you to insure possessions through private means. Do not prop any unattended doors and be sure to lock your room and suite doors at all times.

Pest Control

If you notice a pest problem, contact the Facilities Office directly. Your cooperation in properly storing food and quickly reporting any pest problems will assist us in maintaining a clean and sanitary environment.  Students are expected to follow the directions of Facilities and/or Residence Life Staff in order to assist in the elimination of any pests in the residence halls.

Pets 

Only non-meat-eating fish in aquariums up to 10 gallons are allowed. All other pets are prohibited within student rooms and common areas. Prohibited pets include, but are not limited to: snakes, rabbits, cats, dogs, mice, rats, hamsters, etc. Visiting pets are not allowed as well. If a prohibited pet is found in a resident’s room, a fine of $50 will be levied along with an additional fine of $25 a day until the animal is removed from the residence hall. If not removed within a week of violation, a local shelter will be contacted to come in and remove the pet(s).

Pitzer Service Road

The Pitzer Service Road is intended for emergency vehicles access. No campus parking is allowed on the entirety of the Service Road. The Service Road is typically closed: Monday - Friday, 5 p.m. - 8 a.m.: Saturday - Sunday and College holidays. Special hours will be posted for residence hall move-in and move out. For after-hours issues, contact: Campus Safety 909-607-2000.

Posting Policy 

All flyers, posters or banners posted on campus must have a Pitzer College approved posting stamp indicating approval for posting, to be obtained by visiting the Office of Student Affairs in Scott Hall 120. All postings not on bulletin boards must be hung with blue painters’ tape. Postings on glass doors or painted surfaces will be removed. Please respect our campus art and refrain from posting on any pieces. You are responsible for removing your flyers, posters or banners in a timely manner. Any posting that is in violation of our posting publicity guidelines and procedures (see Event Resources: Posting Publicity Guidelines) may be removed immediately.

Pranks 

Pranks that endanger or could be perceived as a threat to another person’s safety, wellbeing, and/or security are prohibited. It is expected that students are conscious of their actions and conduct their life at Pitzer with respect for all who visit, reside, and work in our communities.

Propping of Doors 

The propping of doors endangers the safety of every hall resident. Propping includes, but is not limited to, taping or stuffing the door mechanism, leaving your door “unlatched”, and placing any object which obstructs the door from being fully closed. The exterior doors in the residence halls are locked 24 hours, 7 days a week. Keep your hall safe: do not prop unattended doors!

Public Areas

Students cannot sleep overnight in any public areas on-campus.

Refund Policy for Housing Cancellation 

All charges will be issued following the formal Withdrawal or Leave of Absence policies as written in the Refund Policies section per the Pitzer College Course Catalog.

Residence Hall Check-In/Check-Out Procedure 

Please adhere to all opening and closing information guidelines for scheduled opening and closing periods.

Residence Hall Council (RHC)

Residence Hall Council (RHC) is the planning and governance organization of the residence halls. Students involved in RHC, whether they hold an office or not, take an active role in planning activities and programs geared towards fostering a positive living community, and in approving the use of Hall funds. They also represent students in voicing concerns and suggestions related to the quality of residence life (i.e., facilities, programs, services, and general maintenance.) All residents of the hall are encouraged to attend RHC so that they may be aware of the inner workings of the hall.

Residence Life Office

The Residence Life Office is located in East Sanborn C300. Students can pick up items such as toilet paper, limited cleaning supplies, vacuums, and trash bags Similar items can be found at the Housing Office at CCA.

Renter’s Insurance

All students are highly encouraged to obtain Renter’s Insurance or look into coverage for their personal belongings while they live on-campus.

Residency Requirement 

All students who have entered into a residence hall agreement by requirement or choice are financially responsible for the entire academic year’s room and board charges unless notified in writing that they have been granted off-campus status or are studying abroad. Students who abandon or do not claim their assigned space can be relocated to other spaces within College housing at the discretion of the Residence Life Office contingent on space availability.

Students granted off-campus status based on false or misleading information will have their status reversed and will be responsible for all applicable room and board fees.

Roofs 

Students are strictly prohibited from the roofs of all campus buildings. Roofs include but are not limited to the lower Mead lobby roof and any area outside of the fenced in sundecks of Mead, PAS and WES halls.

Room Changes 

There is a room change period each semester during the second week of classes. Students may request a room change by filling out the Room Change Week Form. CCA does not participate in room change week. Room changes will be approved subject to availability. If you are approved to move, you will have no more than 48 hours to complete the move.

If you change or swap rooms without going through proper procedures, you may be charged $50 and be required to move back into your assigned room. A subsequent $25 charge can be issued for each day of non-compliance.  Also, if you “double occupy” a room (i.e. an individual person who uses both beds/both sides of the room) these same fees will apply.  Please follow room change guidelines.

Residence Life does not honor requests for room changes that are discriminatory of individuals based on race, color, creed, religion, national or ethnic origin, sex, gender, age, sexual orientation, marital status, pregnancy, disability, medical condition, or veteran status.

Room Condition Report 

The opportunity to complete an online Room Condition Report (RCRs) is provided to all students when they move into their rooms. These forms have been prepared to describe the condition of the room at the time of occupancy. These forms are used at the beginning and end of the occupancy period to evaluate any damage during that time. Each student is expected to complete the online form within 72 hours of moving into a room. Failure to note any discrepancies between the form and the room or failure to complete the RCR could result in billing for preexisting damage. All students are encouraged to review room condition reports carefully.

Room Draw/Room Selection 

Room selection is conducted by Residence Life each spring for the following academic year. A complete set of guidelines and dates are available from the Residence Life Office, and on the Pitzer College website at www.pitzer.edu/student-life/housing/room-draw/

Students who secure housing during Room Draw and submit an off-campus application after Room Draw will only be approved if the College is able to find a replacement for the reserved bed space. Therefore, approval is not guaranteed. If a student applies for off-campus status during the academic year, approval is not guaranteed.

Screens/Windows 

Removal of residence hall window screens is prohibited. Residents may be held financially responsible for the removal of and damage to the screens and judicial sanctions may be imposed. Windows may not be used as points of entrance to or egress from residence hall rooms.

Security Screens

Select rooms in Mead Hall have security screens that have sealed tabs that help keep windows secure. Residents may be held financially responsible for damage to the screens and judicial sanctions will be imposed for the misuse of the security screens. If a security screen tag is found to be broken, the residents of the room will be charged.

Self-Checkout 

To check out of the residence halls when vacating, all residents will complete a Self-Checkout form online. Their room will be inspected at a later time by the residence hall staff and charges may be billed to their student account.

Service Animals 

Pitzer College permits individually-trained dogs that qualify as service animals on campus. A service animal is defined as: Any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The work or task that the dog performs must be directly related to the individual’s disability.

The following animals are not considered service animals under titles II and III of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA);

  • Any animal besides dogs (though there are special provisions permitting miniature horses in some cases);
  • Animals that serve solely to provide a crime deterrent effect, and
  • Emotional support, comfort, or companion animals.

The regulations also provide that Pitzer College need not accommodate a service animal if it poses a direct threat to the health and safety of others, the owner cannot effectively control it, or if the animal is not housebroken.

Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) 

Pitzer College is committed to reasonably accommodating students with disabilities in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. In accordance with the Fair Housing Act, an individual with a disability may have the right to have an animal in campus housing if the animal qualifies as a ‘reasonable accommodation’ that is necessary to afford the student equal opportunity to use and enjoy the housing; (assuming that the use of the animal does not pose a direct threat). A recommendation from the Associate Dean of Students and Director of Academic Support Services is required for students to receive these considerations on the basis of a disability.

To request accommodating an Emotional Support Animal (ESA) in housing, students must first contact Academic Support Services in the Office of Student Affairs (Scott Hall 120, 909.607.3553).  Academic Support Services determines if a student is eligible for programs and services. All information/documentation that is submitted by students will be considered confidential and held in Academic Support Services.  Further documentation from a licensed physician and/or clinician must be submitted along with the request.

Upon approval students with an ESA must review and sign an ESA Agreement before an ESA is allowed on campus. ESAs on campus without approval will be removed and will no longer be considered for eligibility of approval for the remaining semester. The ESA Agreement outlines guidelines and student responsibilities as well as potential causes for removal of the ESA from campus housing.

Single Rooms 

Each residence hall at Pitzer has a limited number of single occupancy rooms that are available to students in their third or fourth year of on-campus housing at the single room rate. Please see Room Draw Guidelines online for further information.

Smoking Policy 

Students living in the residence halls have the right to exist in a smoke-free environment. As a supplement to Pitzer’s policy on smoking, the following guidelines are to be followed in the residence halls:

  • Students living in the residence halls have the right to exist in a smoke-free environment. As a supplement to Pitzer’s policy on smoking, the following guidelines are to be followed in the residence halls:

  • Smoking is not permitted in individual rooms or bathrooms. This includes vaping.

  • All public and common areas in the residence halls are non-smoking areas. These areas include, but are not limited to: all common rooms, living rooms, study areas, kitchens, sundecks, elevators, hallways (including exterior walkways), suite areas and Mead balconies.

  • All residence halls are designated as nonsmoking and this includes a 25-feet perimeter around each residence hall.

  • The following are strictly prohibited: pipes, hookahs, water pipes, and any glass or homemade smoking devices. If any of these items are found, they will be confiscated and will not be returned.

Solicitation 

Pitzer College does not allow the unapproved soliciting, promoting, or selling of commercial products or services on the College campus. Students and campus organizations should contact the Office of Student Affairs regarding guidelines in this area.

Social Networking 

Students are encouraged to take proper safety precautions when voluntarily posting personal and/or identifying information on social networking websites, and blogs (e.g. Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, for example). Pitzer College as a matter of practice does not actively monitor language or actions on such sites. Generally, the College will defer to the user policies of the individual social networking website or blog. However, the College may hold students accountable for Student Code of Conduct violations found on such social networking websites and blogs.

Storage 

Pitzer does not provide storage for student belongings or room furnishings; this includes college issued bed frames and mattress that students do not intend to use. If you need to store items over summer break or when you are abroad, you are strongly encouraged to rent off-campus storage facilities that are insured. If you plan to have a storage container delivered to campus, you must register your storage container with the Residence Life Office online. A designated storage container drop off area is located in the East Mesa parking lot. Any unregistered storage containers found on campus will be removed. Please see Off-Campus Storage Options for more information.

Substance-Free Living 

Students interested in being placed in substance-free environments should reach out to the Residence Life Office (housing@pitzer.edu) and designate this request on their housing application.

Suite Draw

Students may select a group of four or eight students who wish to live in a contiguous space on the main campus. At CCA, students can live in groups of between two and six students. Suite Draw applications will be available online during the spring room draw process. Please note that all Suite Draw applications are subject to space availability and are not guaranteed. Please see the Room Draw website for a complete set of rules and regulations regarding Room Draw.

Sun Decks 

Mead has one designated sun deck and WES/PAS have several. The policies for use include:

  • Do not climb outside gated/fenced in space onto the roof.
  • Do not throw anything off the sun decks.
  • No smoking, alcohol or drugs allowed on sun decks.
  • Everyone is responsible for cleaning up after themselves.
  • Respect the space and those who maintain the sundecks.

Termination of Housing 

Any student who, in the judgment of the Dean of Students or their designee, presents a clear and present danger to the health, safety, and/or welfare of themselves or other members of the College community; has violated any of the residential housing contract terms; and/or other College policies is subject to termination of their residential housing contract. Students who are dismissed will be required to vacate the residence halls within 48 hours of notification of dismissal. Refunds will be calculated on a case-by-case basis.

Trash/Recycling 

Please dispose of all trash in the designated dumpster or trash cans for your building, place recyclables in the blue recycling bins, and redemption items in the proper bins. Any trash found in common areas, in hallways, or in other areas of the residence halls will be disposed of and any charges will be fined to the smallest identifiable population (i.e. the rooms nearest to the trash).  Do not throw trash off balconies, into planters, or out of windows. During move-in and closing time periods the trash areas in the residence halls will be closed and residents are asked to dispose of their trash in the dumpsters located around the residence halls. Keeping our campus clean is a responsibility we all share.

Vandalism 

Students should not damage College property or the property of other students within the halls. Financial responsibility for vandalism to College property will be treated as common area damage and be assigned to the smallest identifiable population within the residence halls if the individual(s) are not identified. Students found responsible for the damage will be charged for the cost of repair and/or replacement of property and may receive additional sanctions for the act of vandalism itself. Students should not throw objects, such as trash, fruit, sports equipment, etc., against any of the on-campus buildings or residence halls. These activities disturb the community and may cause damage to buildings.

Weapons, Firearms, Explosives and Other 

The following items are absolutely prohibited in the residence halls, and in vehicles anywhere on campus. These items include, but are not limited to, guns (including BB guns, pellet rifles, paint guns and other weapons which propel projectiles), ammunition, knives, switchblades, swords, other bladed weapons, fireworks, and any objects that can be used for blunt force. These items are prohibited even if they are intended for decoration, recreation, or ceremonial use. In addition, combustibles in containers, such as gasoline cans or camping fuel, are never allowed in the residence halls. For more information, visit Firearms, Explosives, and Weapons Policies.

Wheels in Hallways

The use of skateboards, roller blades, bicycles, scooters, etc. in the residence halls, including the exterior walkways in Mead, PAS, West-East and Skandera Halls is prohibited.  Additionally, activities such as football, Frisbee, soccer, and any other sport that utilizes projectiles are prohibited in residence halls. Wipes: Please be kind to our plumbing and only flush toilet paper. DO NOT flush disposable/flushable wipes, menstrual products, paper towels or any non-toilet paper product. Thank you for helping our pipes flow smoothly.

Work Orders 

If anything in your room or a common area in the residence hall is in need of repair, please fill out a work order online at www.pitzer.edu/facilities/work-requests/.  After 5 p.m., please call Campus Safety or stop by the Residence Life Office for an emergency work order. If computer service is needed, please contact Information Technology at help@pitzer.edu.​

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Dining Policies & Procedures

The dining program at Pitzer College provides excellent food service and flexible options. The food service staff at the McConnell Dining Hall and the Grove House are dedicated to making each student’s college dining experience convenient and economical. Dining is offered during Fall, Thanksgiving and Spring breaks; however limited dining halls will be open across The Claremont Colleges. Meal plans are NOT active during the winter and summer breaks.

Claremont Cash 

All students of the Claremont Colleges have a Claremont Cash account established as soon as their ID card is created. Funds may be deposited in an account by cash, check, money order and credit card (Visa and MasterCard) at The Claremont Card Center or online at https://cards.services.claremont.edu/. You may use these funds to purchase meals, books, sweatshirts and any other goods sold at locations accepting Claremont Cash. Unused funds will roll over from one year to the next. There are no cash withdrawals permitted until you terminate, withdraw or graduate from the College.

Meal Plans 

Pitzer College offers three meal-plan options to accommodate a variety of lifestyles and schedules. Students are asked to select one of three plan options when they complete their room draw form online. Changes to that decision can be made within the first week of classes each semester via the student portal. Specific information regarding options, plans and rates are available from the Residence Life Office.

Students without meal plans may purchase individual meals at the door rate upon entering the dining hall, using cash or Claremont Cash. Guest meals can be purchased using cash or Claremont Cash at the door. Alternatively, guest meals may be purchased using Flex Dollars if a student has Flex Dollars remaining on their student account. Prices are posted at the dining hall. All students using a meal plan, Flex Dollars or Claremont Cash must present their student ID card to be swiped at the register.

Pack-outs are available for trips, outings or barbecues. Pack-outs are when students use a meal swipe to pick up food in advance if they know they won’t be present for a meal. Certain restrictions apply. Pack outs must be arranged at least three days in advance. To begin a pack out request, pick up a form from the cashier at the dining hall.

Off-Board Applications 

All students who live on campus are required to be on the meal plan.  If there is a specific medical condition that precludes you from being on the meal plan, you may fill out an Off-Board application. To receive consideration, all completed Off-Board applications must be submitted prior to the end of the second week of the semester. A completed application must include:

  1. Medical documentation stating the medical reason why you are unable to be on the meal plan and a list of the foods you can and cannot eat from your personal physician.

  2. The approval of the Director of Dining Services. To begin the application process, submit the Off-Board Application online and schedule an appointment with the Director of Dining Services, 909.607.8491. Bring the above-mentioned medical documentation with you to this appointment. If you have a special dietary need, Dining Services may be able to specialize a meal plan for you. If they are unable to meet your dietary needs, the Director of Dining Services will forward your application with attached documentation to the Associate Dean of Students and the Residence Life.  All students are financially responsible for board plan costs until notified in writing that there has been a change in their status.

Pitzer Student ID/Meal Card:

Your Pitzer student ID serves as your meal card, giving you access to a number of dining options on campus and throughout the 5-College campuses:

  1. You can use your meal plan at McConnell Dining Hall, a full-service dining facility operated through Food Services or any of the other 5C Dining Halls.

  2. You can use your Flex (a declining balance that comes with each meal plan) at the kitchen in the Grove House, the Shakedown Cafe, the Pit-Stop Café or any other 5-College eating venue.

Your card is the property of Pitzer College and cannot be loaned or transferred. You need to have it in order to enter McConnell Dining Hall, no exceptions. If you lose your student ID you can replace it for a nominal charge. Replacement cards can be obtained at TCC Connection, 800 N. Dartmouth Ave., Claremont, CA. 91711. The TCC Connection is located at the south entrance of the Honnold-Mudd Library.

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Returned Checks/ACH Payments

If a check or online payment remitted to pay a student account is returned unpaid, a fee of $25 (first time) or $35 (subsequent times) will be assessed to the student account.
For more information, please call Student Accounts at 909-621-8191 or visit Student Accounts on the Pitzer website


Smoking

Pitzer has adopted a smoke-free policy that includes all workplaces (including open and closed offices, classrooms and all residence halls); and all enclosed public areas (including the public areas of all the residence halls). Cigarette bins are located 25 feet from the residence halls and enclosed public areas.

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Student Employment

After a student is offered employment by a supervisor, the student must complete the official hiring process by completing forms with Human Resources (for non-work study jobs) or with the Financial Aid Office (for work study jobs) before starting work. Original documents (not copies) of either a passport or driver’s license and social security card (or other forms acceptable as outlined on Form 1-9) must be presented to complete the hiring process. The Human Resources office will notify the supervisor when the student has completed all the necessary paperwork. Students will not be allowed to start work until all paperwork is completed and submitted to Human Resources. Timesheets are due by particular deadlines every two weeks.

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Student Records 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

In compliance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the California Public Information Act, students at Pitzer College are assigned the following rights in regard to education records maintained by the College.

  1. Students have the right to inspect and review education records. Education records, which are maintained by offices throughout the College, are defined as records in any format that directly identifies the student and are maintained Academic Policies 295 by the various offices of the College. Some records may be administered by additional privacy laws and regulations that supersede FERPA, and, therefore, may not be available under this policy. Requests for the inspection and review of education records must be submitted direct to the custodian of the record, following policy and procedure of the office in whose custody the record is maintained.

  2. Students have the right to seek to amend education records. Under FERPA, grades are exempt from this provision. Students with concerns about individual grades are referred to the Dean of Faculty Office.

  3. Students have the right to have some control over the disclosure of information from education records. Students may request that the College restrict the release of directory information by submitting a written request to the Registrar’s Office. Such restrictions remain in effect until cancelled in writing by the student.

  4. In compliance with FERPA, Pitzer College has designated the following items of information as directory information: name and student user name; local and permanent address; local, cell, and permanent phone number; email address; date and place of birth; major field of study; dates of attendance; enrollment status; degrees and awards received; most recent previous institution attended; photographs; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; and the height and weight of members of athletic teams. Directory information is defined as information that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released. Unless restricted by the written request of a student, the College may release directory information without the prior consent of a student. Directory information required for course or classroom participation in courses may not be withheld from faculty and students connected with the particular course. Information that is not directory information is non-directory information and, unless excepted by FERPA, requires the prior written consent of the student for release. Further details and a full description of student records privacy is available from the Registrar’s Office and in the Office of Student Affairs.

Rights of Students

Right to Inspect
Students have the right to review and inspect all of the education records maintained by Pitzer College.

Right to Prevent Disclosures 
Students have the right to prevent disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in their education records to third parties and with certain exceptions allowed by law.

Right to Request Amendment 
Students have the right to seek to have corrected any parts of an education record which they believe to be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of their rights.

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Transportation and Motor Vehicle Policies

Each campus of The Claremont Colleges is accessible to the others via footpaths and sidewalks and vehicles are not necessary for travel between them. For information on transportation resources available to Pitzer students and motor vehicles, visit Transportation on the Pitzer website.

Electric Vehicle Charging

Pitzer College is pleased to provide nine Electric Vehicle Charging Stations for eligible vehicles. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles can help increase energy security, improve fuel economy, lower fuel costs and reduce emissions. For more information on how to utilize charging stations, please contact Facilities at 909-607-2226.

Emergency Transportation

In the event of an accident or severe illness, immediately contact Campus Safety at 909-607-2000. Situations requiring an immediate response necessitate a student being transported to the closest hospital. It is important to note that Pitzer Staff members cannot transport students in situations where transportation to a hospital is immediate. Although well trained, the Office of Student Affairs on-call staff are not medical professionals, and for the health and well-being of the student in immediate distress coupled with the liability concerns, we are unable to provide this level of assistance. However, in case a student requires immediate medical attention, there are various options a student can choose from.

Ambulance

If a student’s condition is serious and requires them to be transported to the nearest hospital, an ambulance may be the best option. This service provides immediate monitored care and the quickest route to the nearest hospital. Students who are 18 and over may refuse ambulance service only if the EMTs believe that the student is not in any immediate danger.  Any student who refuses transport while under the influence of alcohol or other substance may be detained by the Claremont Police Department and monitored from the Claremont Police Station.

Non-Emergency Transportation

Two public transit organizations provide bus services that are most usable for service to Pitzer College students. Foothill Transit connects the San Gabriel Valley and Inland Valley areas while LA County Metro has lines closer to the city of Los Angeles. These lines also connect to each other and to other means of public transportation including subway and train lines. Greyhound also has a location in Claremont and travels cross-country.

Operation of Motor Vehicles

All operators of a motor vehicle must, at minimum, adhere to the following guidelines regarding the operation and parking of their vehicle(s) at the College:

  • All vehicles shall be parked within a designated parking stall as painted on the street or in a parking lot.
  • Vehicles are not permitted to be parked on the grass, on landscaped areas or in any interior area of campus at any time.
  • Vehicles such as, motorcycles, motor scooters, motorbikes, and mopeds, cannot be parked or stored in student rooms or anywhere within the vicinity of residence halls or campus buildings and (except those operated by Campus Safety and emergency vehicles on official business) are prohibited on the interior of campus, i.e., those areas not designated for vehicle traffic.
  • The speed limit on campus streets is 25 miles per hour unless otherwise posted. The speed limit in parking lots is 10 miles per hour. Regardless of posted speed limits, a vehicle operator shall not drive at speeds that are excessive or imprudent for existing road, weather, or traffic conditions.
  • Pedestrians have the right of way.
  • Students must receive explicit written permission to leave vehicles on campus while they are on leave from the college or studying abroad.
  • Between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m., no parking is allowed on any street in Claremont, except for where the street has been specially designated and posted for overnight parking.
  • All state and local traffic laws are enforced at all times on the campus.
  • Parking in fire lanes (red curb) and handicapped spaces (blue curb or wheelchair logo) is prohibited and strictly enforced by Campus Safety, the Claremont Police Department and the Los Angeles County Fire Department.
  • All traffic accidents shall be reported as quickly as possible to Campus Safety.

Parking and Traffic Regulations

The Department of Campus Safety is charged by The Claremont Colleges with the enforcement of the rules and regulations governing the use of vehicles and parking at The Claremont Colleges. The following regulations supplement the Parking and Traffic Regulations published by Campus Safety. Students maintaining motor vehicles are responsible for familiarizing themselves with these regulations. All motor driven conveyances, including but not limited to automobiles, motorcycles, motor scooters, motorbikes, or mopeds, regardless of size, shape or number of wheels, are hereafter defined in these regulations as “vehicle(s).”

Registering a Motor Vehicle

Students living in the residence halls are not permitted to bring vehicles to campus during their first two years due to the limited parking availability. First- and second-year students may petition for exceptions to this policy via an online form that can be accessed online at http://parking.formstack.com/forms/petition. The Transportation Coordinator and the Office of Student Affairs consider exceptions on a case-by-case basis. Please note that an exception may be made on a temporary basis and that an exception one year does not apply to the following year.

Third- and fourth-year students can register with Campus Safety through the Pitzer Transportation Coordinator during the designated one-week registration period that usually takes place at the beginning of the Fall semester. Keep an eye out for Pitzer email communication for specific dates. Students returning from a leave of absence or withdrawal in the spring semester can contact the Transportation Coordinator to obtain a permit.

The cost to register a motor vehicle is currently $70 per fiscal year. The fine for failure to register a motor vehicle is $50 per ticket. After the third ticket, the motor vehicle may be towed. All parking fines are billed to individual student accounts

Every registered vehicle, whenever on campus, shall have a parking permit displayed. Automobiles shall have parking permits displayed inside on the lower, right-hand corner of the front windshield or on an alternative location approved by the Director of Campus Safety. Motorcycles, motor scooters, motorbikes, and mopeds shall have parking permits displayed on the rear fender, or if this is not possible, on the left side of the gas tank. All vehicles not displaying a valid parking permit are subject to being cited and/or towed. 

Charges and Fines

All vehicles must be registered with Campus Safety. The cost to register a motor vehicle is currently $75 per semester or $140 per year. The fine for failure to register a motor vehicle is $50 per ticket. After the third ticket, the motor vehicle may be towed.

Every registered vehicle, whenever on campus, shall have a parking permit displayed. Automobiles shall have parking permits displayed inside on the lower, right-hand corner of the front windshield or on an alternative location approved by the Director of Campus Safety. Motorcycles, motor scooters, motorbikes and mopeds shall have parking permits displayed on the rear fender, or if this is not possible, on the left side of the gas tank. All vehicles not displaying a valid parking permit are subject to being cited and/or towed. 

All parking fines are billed to individual student accounts.

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